Abilify

Name: Abilify

Uses for Abilify

Schizophrenia

Used orally (as aripiprazole) and IM (as extended-release aripiprazole or aripiprazole lauroxil injection) for treatment of schizophrenia.1 2 3 9 89 91 93 118 119 120 121 122

American Psychiatric Association (APA) considers most atypical antipsychotic agents first-line drugs for the management of the acute phase of schizophrenia (including first psychotic episodes).28

Patients who do not respond to or tolerate one drug may be successfully treated with an agent from a different class or with a different adverse effect profile.28 70 71 72 115

Used IM (as immediate-release aripiprazole injection) for acute management of agitation in patients with schizophrenia for whom treatment with aripiprazole is appropriate and who require an IM antipsychotic agent for rapid control of behaviors that interfere with diagnosis and care (e.g., threatening behaviors, escalating or urgently distressing behavior, self-exhausting behavior).1 86 87

Bipolar Disorder

Used orally alone or in conjunction with lithium or valproate for acute treatment of manic and mixed episodes associated with bipolar I disorder with or without psychotic features.1 67 90

Has been used orally as monotherapy or as adjunctive therapy with lithium or valproate for longer-term maintenance treatment of bipolar I disorder†;1 112 127 129 130 131 however, aripiprazole's long-term efficacy for this use has been questioned by some clinicians127 and maintenance treatment of bipolar disorder is no longer an FDA-labeled indication for the drug.1

Used IM (as immediate-release aripiprazole injection) for acute management of agitation in patients with bipolar I disorder, manic or mixed, for whom treatment with aripiprazole is appropriate and who require an IM antipsychotic agent for rapid control of behaviors that interfere with diagnosis and care (e.g., threatening behaviors, escalating or urgently distressing behavior, self-exhausting behavior).1 88

Adjunctive Therapy of Major Depressive Disorder

Used orally as adjunctive therapy to antidepressants for acute treatment of major depressive disorder.1 85

Irritability Associated with Autistic Disorder

Used orally for acute treatment of irritability associated with autistic disorder.1 109 110

Tourette's Syndrome

Used orally for treatment of Tourette's syndrome (Gilles de la Tourette’s syndrome).1 124

Uses For Abilify

Aripiprazole is used alone or together with other medicines to treat mental conditions such as bipolar I disorder (manic-depressive illness), major depressive disorder, and schizophrenia. It is also used in children to treat irritability associated with autistic disorder and Tourette syndrome. Aripiprazole works in the brain to change how certain chemicals affect patients. It is an antipsychotic agent.

This medicine is available only with your doctor's prescription. Abilify® oral solution was withdrawn from the market on May 15, 2015 and this dose form is not marketed by any generic manufacturers.

Warnings and Precautions

Increased Mortality in Elderly Patients with Dementia-Related Psychosis

Increased Mortality

Elderly patients with dementia-related psychosis treated with antipsychotic drugs are at an increased risk of death. Abilify (aripiprazole) is not approved for the treatment of patients with dementia-related psychosis [see BOXED WARNING].

Safety Experience in Elderly Patients with Psychosis Associated with Alzheimer’s Disease

In three, 10-week, placebo-controlled studies of Abilify in elderly patients with psychosis associated with Alzheimer’s disease (n=938; mean age: 82.4 years; range: 56-99 years), the adverse reactions that were reported at an incidence of ≥3% and Abilify incidence at least twice that for placebo were lethargy [placebo 2%, Abilify 5%], somnolence (including sedation) [placebo 3%, Abilify 8%], and incontinence (primarily, urinary incontinence) [placebo 1%, Abilify 5%], excessive salivation [placebo 0%, Abilify 4%], and lightheadedness [placebo 1%, Abilify 4%].

The safety and efficacy of Abilify in the treatment of patients with psychosis associated with dementia have not been established. If the prescriber elects to treat such patients with Abilify, assess for the emergence of difficulty swallowing or excessive somnolence, which could predispose to accidental injury or aspiration [see BOXED WARNING].

5.2 Cerebrovascular Adverse Events, Including Stroke

In placebo-controlled clinical studies (two flexible dose and one fixed dose study) of dementia-related psychosis, there was an increased incidence of cerebrovascular adverse events (e.g., stroke, transient ischemic attack), including fatalities, in Abilify-treated patients (mean age: 84 years; range: 78-88 years). In the fixed-dose study, there was a statistically significant dose response relationship for cerebrovascular adverse events in patients treated with Abilify. Abilify is not approved for the treatment of patients with dementia-related psychosis [see BOXED WARNING].

Suicidal Thoughts and Behaviors in Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults

Patients with major depressive disorder (MDD), both adult and pediatric, may experience worsening of their depression and/or the emergence of suicidal ideation and behavior (suicidality) or unusual changes in behavior, whether or not they are taking antidepressant medications, and this risk may persist until significant remission occurs. Suicide is a known risk of depression and certain other psychiatric disorders, and these disorders themselves are the strongest predictors of suicide. There has been a long-standing concern, however, that antidepressants may have a role in inducing worsening of depression and the emergence of suicidality in certain patients during the early phases of treatment. Pooled analyses of short-term, placebo-controlled trials of antidepressant drugs (SSRIs and others) showed that these drugs increase the risk of suicidal thinking and behavior (suicidality) in children, adolescents, and young adults (ages 18-24) with MDD and other psychiatric disorders. Short-term studies did not show an increase in the risk of suicidality with antidepressants compared to placebo in adults beyond age 24; there was a reduction with antidepressants compared to placebo in adults aged 65 and older.

The pooled analyses of placebo-controlled trials in children and adolescents with MDD, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD), or other psychiatric disorders included a total of 24 short-term trials of 9 antidepressant drugs in over 4400 patients. The pooled analyses of placebo-controlled trials in adults with MDD or other psychiatric disorders included a total of 295 short-term trials (median duration of 2 months) of 11 antidepressant drugs in over 77,000 patients. There was considerable variation in risk of suicidality among drugs, but a tendency toward an increase in the younger patients for almost all drugs studied. There were differences in absolute risk of suicidality across the different indications, with the highest incidence in MDD. The risk differences (drug vs. placebo), however, were relatively stable within age strata and across indications. These risk differences (drug-placebo difference in the number of cases of suicidality per 1000 patients treated) are provided in Table 5.

Table 5:
  Age Range   Drug-Placebo Difference in Number of Cases of Suicidality per 1000 Patients Treated
  Increases Compared to Placebo
  <18   14 additional cases
  18-24   5 additional cases
  Decreases Compared to Placebo
  25-64   1 fewer case
  ≥65   6 fewer cases

No suicides occurred in any of the pediatric trials. There were suicides in the adult trials, but the number was not sufficient to reach any conclusion about drug effect on suicide.

It is unknown whether the suicidality risk extends to longer-term use, i.e., beyond several months. However, there is substantial evidence from placebo-controlled maintenance trials in adults with depression that the use of antidepressants can delay the recurrence of depression.

All patients being treated with antidepressants for any indication should be monitored appropriately and observed closely for clinical worsening, suicidality, and unusual changes in behavior, especially during the initial few months of a course of drug therapy, or at times of dose changes, either increases or decreases.

The following symptoms, anxiety, agitation, panic attacks, insomnia, irritability, hostility, aggressiveness, impulsivity, akathisia (psychomotor restlessness), hypomania, and mania, have been reported in adult and pediatric patients being treated with antidepressants for MDD as well as for other indications, both psychiatric and nonpsychiatric. Although a causal link between the emergence of such symptoms and either the worsening of depression and/or the emergence of suicidal impulses has not been established, there is concern that such symptoms may represent precursors to emerging suicidality.

Consideration should be given to changing the therapeutic regimen, including possibly discontinuing the medication, in patients whose depression is persistently worse, or who are experiencing emergent suicidality or symptoms that might be precursors to worsening depression or suicidality, especially if these symptoms are severe, abrupt in onset, or were not part of the patient’s presenting symptoms.

Families and caregivers of patients being treated with antidepressants for major depressive disorder or other indications, both psychiatric and nonpsychiatric, should be alerted about the need to monitor patients for the emergence of agitation, irritability, unusual changes in behavior, and the other symptoms described above, as well as the emergence of suicidality, and to report such symptoms immediately to healthcare providers. Such monitoring should include daily observation by families and caregivers. Prescriptions for Abilify should be written for the smallest quantity of tablets consistent with good patient management, in order to reduce the risk of overdose.

Screening Patients for Bipolar Disorder: A major depressive episode may be the initial presentation of bipolar disorder. It is generally believed (though not established in controlled trials) that treating such an episode with an antidepressant alone may increase the likelihood of precipitation of a mixed/manic episode in patients at risk for bipolar disorder. Whether any of the symptoms described above represent such a conversion is unknown. However, prior to initiating treatment with an antidepressant, patients with depressive symptoms should be adequately screened to determine if they are at risk for bipolar disorder; such screening should include a detailed psychiatric history, including a family history of suicide, bipolar disorder, and depression.

It should be noted that Abilify is not approved for use in treating depression in the pediatric population.

Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome (NMS)

A potentially fatal symptom complex sometimes referred to as Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome (NMS) may occur with administration of antipsychotic drugs, including Abilify. Rare cases of NMS occurred during Abilify treatment in the worldwide clinical database. Clinical manifestations of NMS are hyperpyrexia, muscle rigidity, altered mental status, and evidence of autonomic instability (irregular pulse or blood pressure, tachycardia, diaphoresis, and cardiac dysrhythmia). Additional signs may include elevated creatine phosphokinase, myoglobinuria (rhabdomyolysis), and acute renal failure.

The diagnostic evaluation of patients with this syndrome is complicated. In arriving at a diagnosis, it is important to exclude cases where the clinical presentation includes both serious medical illness (e.g., pneumonia, systemic infection) and untreated or inadequately treated extrapyramidal signs and symptoms (EPS). Other important considerations in the differential diagnosis include central anticholinergic toxicity, heat stroke, drug fever, and primary central nervous system pathology.

The management of NMS should include: 1) immediate discontinuation of antipsychotic drugs and other drugs not essential to concurrent therapy; 2) intensive symptomatic treatment and medical monitoring; and 3) treatment of any concomitant serious medical problems for which specific treatments are available. There is no general agreement about specific pharmacological treatment regimens for uncomplicated NMS.

If a patient requires antipsychotic drug treatment after recovery from NMS, the potential reintroduction of drug therapy should be carefully considered. The patient should be carefully monitored, since recurrences of NMS have been reported.

Tardive Dyskinesia

A syndrome of potentially irreversible, involuntary, dyskinetic movements may develop in patients treated with antipsychotic drugs. Although the prevalence of the syndrome appears to be highest among the elderly, especially elderly women, it is impossible to rely upon prevalence estimates to predict, at the inception of antipsychotic treatment, which patients are likely to develop the syndrome. Whether antipsychotic drug products differ in their potential to cause tardive dyskinesia is unknown.

The risk of developing tardive dyskinesia and the likelihood that it will become irreversible are believed to increase as the duration of treatment and the total cumulative dose of antipsychotic drugs administered to the patient increase. However, the syndrome can develop, although much less commonly, after relatively brief treatment periods at low doses.

There is no known treatment for established cases of tardive dyskinesia, although the syndrome may remit, partially or completely, if antipsychotic treatment is withdrawn. Antipsychotic treatment, itself, however, may suppress (or partially suppress) the signs and symptoms of the syndrome and, thereby, may possibly mask the underlying process. The effect that symptomatic suppression has upon the long-term course of the syndrome is unknown.

Given these considerations, Abilify should be prescribed in a manner that is most likely to minimize the occurrence of tardive dyskinesia. Chronic antipsychotic treatment should generally be reserved for patients who suffer from a chronic illness that (1) is known to respond to antipsychotic drugs and (2) for whom alternative, equally effective, but potentially less harmful treatments are not available or appropriate. In patients who do require chronic treatment, the smallest dose and the shortest duration of treatment producing a satisfactory clinical response should be sought. The need for continued treatment should be reassessed periodically.

If signs and symptoms of tardive dyskinesia appear in a patient on Abilify, drug discontinuation should be considered. However, some patients may require treatment with Abilify despite the presence of the syndrome.

Metabolic Changes

Atypical antipsychotic drugs have been associated with metabolic changes that include hyperglycemia/diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, and body weight gain. While all drugs in the class have been shown to produce some metabolic changes, each drug has its own specific risk profile.

Hyperglycemia/Diabetes Mellitus

Hyperglycemia, in some cases extreme and associated with ketoacidosis or hyperosmolar coma or death, has been reported in patients treated with atypical antipsychotics. There have been reports of hyperglycemia in patients treated with Abilify [see ADVERSE REACTIONS (6.1, 6.2)]. Assessment of the relationship between atypical antipsychotic use and glucose abnormalities is complicated by the possibility of an increased background risk of diabetes mellitus in patients with schizophrenia and the increasing incidence of diabetes mellitus in the general population. Given these confounders, the relationship between atypical antipsychotic use and hyperglycemia-related adverse events is not completely understood. However, epidemiological studies suggest an increased risk of hyperglycemia-related adverse reactions in patients treated with the atypical antipsychotics. Because Abilify was not marketed at the time these studies were performed, it is not known if Abilify is associated with this increased risk. Precise risk estimates for hyperglycemia-related adverse reactions in patients treated with atypical antipsychotics are not available.

Patients with an established diagnosis of diabetes mellitus who are started on atypical antipsychotics should be monitored regularly for worsening of glucose control. Patients with risk factors for diabetes mellitus (e.g., obesity, family history of diabetes) who are starting treatment with atypical antipsychotics should undergo fasting blood glucose testing at the beginning of treatment and periodically during treatment. Any patient treated with atypical antipsychotics should be monitored for symptoms of hyperglycemia including polydipsia, polyuria, polyphagia, and weakness. Patients who develop symptoms of hyperglycemia during treatment with atypical antipsychotics should undergo fasting blood glucose testing. In some cases, hyperglycemia has resolved when the atypical antipsychotic was discontinued; however, some patients required continuation of anti-diabetic treatment despite discontinuation of the suspect drug.

Adults

In an analysis of 13 placebo-controlled monotherapy trials in adults, primarily with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder, the mean change in fasting glucose in Abilify-treated patients (+4.4 mg/dL; median exposure 25 days; N=1057) was not significantly different than in placebo-treated patients (+2.5 mg/dL; median exposure 22 days; N=799). Table 6 shows the proportion of Abilify-treated patients with normal and borderline fasting glucose at baseline (median exposure 25 days) that had treatment-emergent high fasting glucose measurements compared to placebo-treated patients (median exposure 22 days).

Table 6: Changes in Fasting Glucose From Placebo-Controlled Monotherapy Trials in Adult Patients

Fasting Glucose

  Category Change (at least once) from Baseline   Treatment Arm   n/N   %
  Normal to High   (<100 mg/dL to ≥126 mg/dL)   Abilify   31/822   3.8
  Placebo   22/605   3.6
  Borderline to High   (≥100 mg/dL and <126 mg/dL to ≥126 mg/dL)   Abilify   31/176   17.6
  Placebo   13/142   9.2

At 24 weeks, the mean change in fasting glucose in Abilify-treated patients was not significantly different than in placebo-treated patients [+2.2 mg/dL (n=42) and +9.6 mg/dL (n=28), respectively].

The mean change in fasting glucose in adjunctive Abilify-treated patients with major depressive disorder (+0.7 mg/dL; median exposure 42 days; N=241) was not significantly different than in placebo-treated patients (+0.8 mg/dL; median exposure 42 days; N=246). Table 7 shows the proportion of adult patients with changes in fasting glucose levels from two placebo-controlled, adjunctive trials (median exposure 42 days) in patients with major depressive disorder.

Table 7: Changes in Fasting Glucose From Placebo-Controlled Adjunctive Trials in Adult Patients with Major Depressive Disorder

Fasting Glucose

  Category Change (at least once) from Baseline   Treatment Arm   n/N   %
  Normal to High   (<100 mg/dL to ≥126 mg/dL)   Abilify   2/201   1.0
  Placebo   2/204   1.0
  Borderline to High   (≥100 mg/dL and <126 mg/dL to ≥126 mg/dL)   Abilify   4/34   11.8
  Placebo   3/37   8.1
Pediatric Patients and Adolescents

In an analysis of two placebo-controlled trials in adolescents with schizophrenia (13 to 17 years) and pediatric patients with bipolar disorder (10 to 17 years), the mean change in fasting glucose in Abilify-treated patients (+4.8 mg/dL; with a median exposure of 43 days; N=259) was not significantly different than in placebo-treated patients (+1.7 mg/dL; with a median exposure of 42 days; N=123).

In an analysis of two placebo-controlled trials in pediatric and adolescent patients with irritability associated with autistic disorder (6 to 17 years) with median exposure of 56 days, the mean change in fasting glucose in Abilify-treated patients (–0.2 mg/dL; N=83) was not significantly different than in placebo-treated patients (–0.6 mg/dL; N=33).

In an analysis of two placebo-controlled trials in pediatric and adolescent patients with Tourette’s disorder (6 to 18 years) with median exposure of 57 days, the mean change in fasting glucose in Abilify-treated patients (0.79 mg/dL; N=90) was not significantly different than in placebo-treated patients (–1.66 mg/dL; N=58).

Table 8 shows the proportion of patients with changes in fasting glucose levels from the pooled adolescent schizophrenia and pediatric bipolar patients (median exposure of 42-43 days), from two placebo-controlled trials in pediatric patients (6 to 17 years) with irritability associated with autistic disorder (median exposure of 56 days), and from the two placebo-controlled trials in pediatric patients (6 to 18 year) with Tourette’s Disorder (median exposure 57 days).

Table 8: Changes in Fasting Glucose From Placebo-Controlled Trials in Pediatric and Adolescent Patients
  Category Change (at least once) from Baseline   Indication   Treatment Arm   n/N   %

Fasting Glucose

Normal to High

(<100 mg/dL to ≥126 mg/dL)

  Pooled Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder   Abilify   2/236   0.8
  Placebo   2/110   1.8
  Irritability Associated with Autistic Disorder   Abilify   0/73   0
  Placebo   0/32   0
  Tourette’s Disorder   Abilify   3/88   3.4
  Placebo   1/58   1.7

Fasting Glucose

Borderline to High

(≥100 mg/dL and <126 mg/dL to ≥126 mg/dL)

  Pooled Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder   Abilify   1/22   4.5
  Placebo   0/12   0
  Irritability Associated with Autistic Disorder   Abilify   0/9   0
  Placebo   0/1   0
  Tourette’s Disorder   Abilify   0/11   0
  Placebo   0/4   0

At 12 weeks in the pooled adolescent schizophrenia and pediatric bipolar disorder trials, the mean change in fasting glucose in Abilify-treated patients was not significantly different than in placebo-treated patients [+2.4 mg/dL (n=81) and +0.1 mg/dL (n=15), respectively].

Dyslipidemia

Undesirable alterations in lipids have been observed in patients treated with atypical antipsychotics.

There were no significant differences between Abilify- and placebo-treated patients in the proportion with changes from normal to clinically significant levels for fasting/nonfasting total cholesterol, fasting triglycerides, fasting LDLs, and fasting/nonfasting HDLs. Analyses of patients with at least 12 or 24 weeks of exposure were limited by small numbers of patients.

Adults

Table 9 shows the proportion of adult patients, primarily from pooled schizophrenia and bipolar disorder monotherapy placebo-controlled trials, with changes in total cholesterol (pooled from 17 trials; median exposure 21 to 25 days), fasting triglycerides (pooled from eight trials; median exposure 42 days), fasting LDL cholesterol (pooled from eight trials; median exposure 39 to 45 days, except for placebo-treated patients with baseline normal fasting LDL measurements, who had median treatment exposure of 24 days) and HDL cholesterol (pooled from nine trials; median exposure 40 to 42 days).

Table 9: Changes in Blood Lipid Parameters From Placebo-Controlled Monotherapy Trials in Adults
  Treatment Arm   n/N   %

Total Cholesterol

Normal to High

(<200 mg/dL to ≥240 mg/dL)

  Abilify   34/1357   2.5
  Placebo   27/973   2.8

Fasting Triglycerides

Normal to High

(<150 mg/dL to ≥200 mg/dL)

  Abilify   40/539   7.4
  Placebo   30/431   7.0

Fasting LDL Cholesterol

Normal to High

(<100 mg/dL to ≥160 mg/dL)

  Abilify   2/332   0.6
  Placebo   2/268   0.7

HDL Cholesterol

Normal to Low

(≥40 mg/dL to <40 mg/dL)

  Abilify   121/1066   11.4
  Placebo   99/794   12.5

In monotherapy trials in adults, the proportion of patients at 12 weeks and 24 weeks with changes from Normal to High in total cholesterol (fasting/nonfasting), fasting triglycerides, and fasting LDL cholesterol were similar between Abilify- and placebo-treated patients: at 12 weeks, Total Cholesterol (fasting/nonfasting), 1/71 (1.4%) vs. 3/74 (4.1%); Fasting Triglycerides, 8/62 (12.9%) vs. 5/37 (13.5%); Fasting LDL Cholesterol, 0/34 (0%) vs. 1/25 (4.0%), respectively; and at 24 weeks, Total Cholesterol (fasting/nonfasting), 1/42 (2.4%) vs. 3/37 (8.1%); Fasting Triglycerides, 5/34 (14.7%) vs. 5/20 (25%); Fasting LDL Cholesterol, 0/22 (0%) vs. 1/18 (5.6%), respectively.

Table 10 shows the proportion of patients with changes in total cholesterol (fasting/nonfasting), fasting triglycerides, fasting LDL cholesterol, and HDL cholesterol from two placebo-controlled adjunctive trials in adult patients with major depressive disorder (median exposure 42 days).

Table 10: Changes in Blood Lipid Parameters From Placebo-Controlled Adjunctive Trials in Adult Patients with Major Depressive Disorder
  Treatment Arm   n/N   %

Total Cholesterol

Normal to High

(<200 mg/dL to ≥240 mg/dL)

  Abilify   3/139   2.2
  Placebo   7/135   5.2

Fasting Triglycerides

Normal to High

(<150 mg/dL to ≥200 mg/dL)

  Abilify   14/145   9.7
  Placebo   6/147   4.1

Fasting LDL Cholesterol

Normal to High

(<100 mg/dL to ≥160 mg/dL)

  Abilify   0/54   0
  Placebo   0/73   0

HDL Cholesterol

Normal to Low

(≥40 mg/dL to <40 mg/dL)

  Abilify   17/318   5.3
  Placebo   10/286   3.5
Pediatric Patients and Adolescents

Table 11 shows the proportion of adolescents with schizophrenia (13 to 17 years) and pediatric patients with bipolar disorder (10 to 17 years) with changes in total cholesterol and HDL cholesterol (pooled from two placebo-controlled trials; median exposure 42 to 43 days) and fasting triglycerides (pooled from two placebo-controlled trials; median exposure 42 to 44 days).

Table 11: Changes in Blood Lipid Parameters From Placebo-Controlled Monotherapy Trials in Pediatric and Adolescent Patients in Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder
  Treatment Arm   n/N   %

Total Cholesterol

Normal to High

(<170 mg/dL to ≥200 mg/dL)

  Abilify   3/220   1.4
  Placebo   0/116   0

Fasting Triglycerides

Normal to High

(<150 mg/dL to ≥200 mg/dL)

  Abilify   7/187   3.7
  Placebo   4/85   4.7

HDL Cholesterol

Normal to Low

(≥40 mg/dL to <40 mg/dL)

  Abilify   27/236   11.4
  Placebo   22/109   20.2

In monotherapy trials of adolescents with schizophrenia and pediatric patients with bipolar disorder, the proportion of patients at 12 weeks and 24 weeks with changes from Normal to High in total cholesterol (fasting/nonfasting), fasting triglycerides, and fasting LDL cholesterol were similar between Abilify- and placebo-treated patients: at 12 weeks, Total Cholesterol (fasting/nonfasting), 0/57 (0%) vs. 0/15 (0%); Fasting Triglycerides, 2/72 (2.8%) vs. 1/14 (7.1%), respectively; and at 24 weeks, Total Cholesterol (fasting/nonfasting), 0/36 (0%) vs. 0/12 (0%); Fasting Triglycerides, 1/47 (2.1%) vs. 1/10 (10.0%), respectively.

Table 12 shows the proportion of patients with changes in total cholesterol (fasting/nonfasting) and fasting triglycerides (median exposure 56 days) and HDL cholesterol (median exposure 55 to 56 days) from two placebo-controlled trials in pediatric patients (6 to 17 years) with irritability associated with autistic disorder.

Table 12: Changes in Blood Lipid Parameters From Placebo-Controlled Trials in Pediatric Patients with Autistic Disorder
  Treatment Arm   n/N   %

Total Cholesterol

Normal to High

(<170 mg/dL to ≥200 mg/dL)

  Abilify   1/95   1.1
  Placebo   0/34   0

Fasting Triglycerides

Normal to High

(<150 mg/dL to ≥200 mg/dL)

  Abilify   0/75   0
  Placebo   0/30   0

HDL Cholesterol

Normal to Low

(≥40 mg/dL to <40 mg/dL)

  Abilify   9/107   8.4
  Placebo   5/49   10.2

Table 13 shows the proportion of patients with changes in total cholesterol (fasting/nonfasting) and fasting triglycerides (median exposure 57 days) and HDL cholesterol (median exposure 57 days) from two placebo-controlled trials in pediatric patients (6 to 18 years) with Tourette’s Disorder.

Table 13: Changes in Blood Lipid Parameters From Placebo-Controlled Trials in Pediatric Patients with Tourette’s Disorder

Treatment Arm

n/N

%

Total Cholesterol

Normal to High

(<170 mg/dL to ≥200 mg/dL)

Abilify

1/85

1.2

Placebo

0/46

0

Fasting Triglycerides

Normal to High

(<150 mg/dL to ≥200 mg/dL)

Abilify

5/94

5.3

Placebo

2/55

3.6

HDL Cholesterol

Normal to Low

(≥40 mg/dL to <40 mg/dL)

Abilify

4/108

3.7

Placebo

2/67

3.0

Weight Gain

Weight gain has been observed with atypical antipsychotic use. Clinical monitoring of weight is recommended.

Adults

In an analysis of 13 placebo-controlled monotherapy trials, primarily from pooled schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, with a median exposure of 21 to 25 days, the mean change in body weight in Abilify-treated patients was +0.3 kg (N=1673) compared to –0.1 kg (N=1100) in placebo-controlled patients. At 24 weeks, the mean change from baseline in body weight in Abilify-treated patients was –1.5 kg (n=73) compared to
–0.2 kg (n=46) in placebo-treated patients.

In the trials adding Abilify to antidepressants, patients first received 8 weeks of antidepressant treatment followed by 6 weeks of adjunctive Abilify or placebo in addition to their ongoing antidepressant treatment. The mean change in body weight in patients receiving adjunctive Abilify was +1.7 kg (N=347) compared to +0.4 kg (N=330) in patients receiving adjunctive placebo.

Table 14 shows the percentage of adult patients with weight gain ≥7% of body weight by indication.

Table 14: Percentage of Patients From Placebo-Controlled Trials in Adult Patients with Weight Gain ≥7% of Body Weight

Weight gain ≥7% of body weight

  Indication   Treatment Arm   N   Patients n (%)
  Schizophreniaa   Abilify   852   69 (8.1)
  Placebo   379   12 (3.2)
  Bipolar Maniab   Abilify   719   16 (2.2)
  Placebo   598   16 (2.7)
  Major Depressive Disorder (Adjunctive Therapy)c   Abilify   347   18 (5.2)
  Placebo   330   2 (0.6)
  a 4-6 weeks duration. b 3 weeks duration. c 6 weeks duration.
Pediatric Patients and Adolescents

In an analysis of two placebo-controlled trials in adolescents with schizophrenia (13 to 17 years) and pediatric patients with bipolar disorder (10 to 17 years) with median exposure of 42 to 43 days, the mean change in body weight in Abilify-treated patients was +1.6 kg (N=381) compared to +0.3 kg (N=187) in placebo-treated patients. At 24 weeks, the mean change from baseline in body weight in Abilify-treated patients was +5.8 kg (n=62) compared to +1.4 kg (n=13) in placebo-treated patients.

In two short-term, placebo-controlled trials in patients (6 to 17 years) with irritability associated with autistic disorder with median exposure of 56 days, the mean change in body weight in Abilify-treated patients was +1.6 kg (n=209) compared to +0.4 kg (n=98) in placebo-treated patients.

In two short-term, placebo-controlled trials in patients (6 to 18 years) with Tourette’s Disorder with median exposure of 57 days, the mean change in body weight in Abilify-treated patients was +1.5 kg (n=105) compared to +0.4 kg (n=66) in placebo-treated patients.

Table 15 shows the percentage of pediatric and adolescent patients with weight gain ≥7% of body weight by indication.

Table 15: Percentage of Patients From Placebo-Controlled Monotherapy Trials in Pediatric and Adolescent Patients with Weight Gain ≥7% of Body Weight

Weight gain ≥7% of body weight

  Indication   Treatment Arm   N   Patients n (%)
  Pooled Schizophrenia and Bipolar Maniaa   Abilify   381   20 (5.2)
  Placebo   187   3 (1.6)
  Irritability Associated with Autistic Disorderb   Abilify   209   55 (26.3)
  Placebo   98   7 (7.1)
  Tourette’s Disorder c   Abilify   105   21 (20.0)
  Placebo   66   5 (7.6)
  a 4-6 weeks duration. b 8 weeks duration. c 8-10 weeks duration.

In an open-label trial that enrolled patients from the two placebo-controlled trials of adolescents with schizophrenia (13 to 17 years) and pediatric patients with bipolar disorder (10 to 17 years), 73.2% of patients (238/325) completed 26 weeks of therapy with Abilify. After 26 weeks, 32.8% of patients gained ≥7% of their body weight, not adjusted for normal growth. To adjust for normal growth, z-scores were derived (measured in standard deviations [SD]), which normalize for the natural growth of pediatric patients and adolescents by comparisons to age- and gender-matched population standards. A z-score change <0.5 SD is considered not clinically significant. After 26 weeks, the mean change in z-score was 0.09 SD.

In an open-label trial that enrolled patients from two short-term, placebo-controlled trials, patients (6 to 17 years) with irritability associated with autistic disorder, as well as de novo patients, 60.3% (199/330) completed one year of therapy with Abilify. The mean change in weight z-score was 0.26 SDs for patients receiving >9 months of treatment.

When treating pediatric patients for any indication, weight gain should be monitored and assessed against that expected for normal growth.

5.7 Pathological Gambling and Other Compulsive Behaviors

Post-marketing case reports suggest that patients can experience intense urges, particularly for gambling, and the inability to control these urges while taking aripiprazole. Other compulsive urges, reported less frequently, include: sexual urges, shopping, eating or binge eating, and other impulsive or compulsive behaviors. Because patients may not recognize these behaviors as abnormal, it is important for prescribers to ask patients or their caregivers specifically about the development of new or intense gambling urges, compulsive sexual urges, compulsive shopping, binge or compulsive eating, or other urges while being treated with aripiprazole. It should be noted that impulse-control symptoms can be associated with the underlying disorder. In some cases, although not all, urges were reported to have stopped when the dose was reduced or the medication was discontinued. Compulsive behaviors may result in harm to the patient and others if not recognized. Consider dose reduction or stopping the medication if a patient develops such urges.

Orthostatic Hypotension

Abilify may cause orthostatic hypotension, perhaps due to its α1-adrenergic receptor antagonism. The incidence of orthostatic hypotension-associated events from short-term, placebo-controlled trials of adult patients on oral Abilify (n=2467) included (Abilify incidence, placebo incidence) orthostatic hypotension (1%, 0.3%), postural dizziness (0.5%, 0.3%), and syncope (0.5%, 0.4%); of pediatric patients 6 to 18 years of age (n=732) on oral Abilify included orthostatic hypotension (0.5%, 0%), postural dizziness (0.4%, 0%), and syncope (0.2%, 0%); and of patients on Abilify Injection (n=501) included orthostatic hypotension (0.6%, 0%), postural dizziness (0.2%, 0.5%), and syncope (0.4%, 0%) [see ADVERSE REACTIONS (6.1)].

The incidence of a significant orthostatic change in blood pressure (defined as a decrease in systolic blood pressure ≥20 mmHg accompanied by an increase in heart rate ≥25 bpm when comparing standing to supine values) for Abilify was not meaningfully different from placebo (Abilify incidence, placebo incidence): in adult oral Abilify-treated patients (4%, 2%), in pediatric oral Abilify-treated patients aged 6 to 18 years (0.4%, 1%), or in Abilify injection-treated patients (3%, 2%).

Abilify should be used with caution in patients with known cardiovascular disease (history of myocardial infarction or ischemic heart disease, heart failure or conduction abnormalities), cerebrovascular disease, or conditions which would predispose patients to hypotension (dehydration, hypovolemia, and treatment with antihypertensive medications) [see DRUG INTERACTIONS (7.1)].

If parenteral benzodiazepine therapy is deemed necessary in addition to Abilify injection treatment, patients should be monitored for excessive sedation and for orthostatic hypotension [seeDRUG INTERACTIONS (7.1)].

5.9 Falls

Antipsychotics, including Abilify, may cause somnolence, postural hypotension, motor and sensory instability, which may lead to falls and, consequently, fractures or other injuries. For patients with diseases, conditions, or medications that could exacerbate these effects, complete fall risk assessments when initiating antipsychotic treatment and recurrently for patients on long-term antipsychotic therapy.

Leukopenia, Neutropenia, and Agranulocytosis

In clinical trials and/or postmarketing experience, events of leukopenia and neutropenia have been reported temporally related to antipsychotic agents, including Abilify. Agranulocytosis has also been reported.

Possible risk factors for leukopenia/neutropenia include pre-existing low white blood cell count (WBC)/absolute neutrophil count (ANC) and history of drug-induced leukopenia/neutropenia. In patients with a history of a clinically significant low WBC/ANC or drug-induced leukopenia/neutropenia, perform a complete blood count (CBC) frequently during the first few months of therapy. In such patients, consider discontinuation of Abilify at the first sign of a clinically significant decline in WBC in the absence of other causative factors.

Monitor patients with clinically significant neutropenia for fever or other symptoms or signs of infection and treat promptly if such symptoms or signs occur. Discontinue Abilify in patients with severe neutropenia (absolute neutrophil count <1000/mm3) and follow their WBC counts until recovery.

Seizures/Convulsions

In short-term, placebo-controlled trials, patients with a history of seizures excluded seizures/convulsions occurred in 0.1% (3/2467) of undiagnosed adult patients treated with oral Abilify, in 0.1% (1/732) of pediatric patients (6 to 18 years), and in 0.2% (1/501) of adult Abilify injection-treated patients.

As with other antipsychotic drugs, Abilify should be used cautiously in patients with a history of seizures or with conditions that lower the seizure threshold. Conditions that lower the seizure threshold may be more prevalent in a population of 65 years or older.

Potential for Cognitive and Motor Impairment

Abilify, like other antipsychotics, may have the potential to impair judgment, thinking, or motor skills. For example, in short-term, placebo-controlled trials, somnolence (including sedation) was reported as follows (Abilify incidence, placebo incidence): in adult patients (n=2467) treated with oral Abilify (11%, 6%), in pediatric patients ages 6 to 17 (n=611) (24%, 6%), and in adult patients (n=501) on Abilify Injection (9%, 6%). Somnolence (including sedation) led to discontinuation in 0.3% (8/2467) of adult patients and 3% (20/732) of pediatric patients (6 to 18 years) on oral Abilify in short-term, placebo-controlled trials, but did not lead to discontinuation of any adult patients on Abilify Injection.

Despite the relatively modest increased incidence of these events compared to placebo, patients should be cautioned about operating hazardous machinery, including automobiles, until they are reasonably certain that therapy with Abilify does not affect them adversely.

Body Temperature Regulation

Disruption of the body’s ability to reduce core body temperature has been attributed to antipsychotic agents. Appropriate care is advised when prescribing Abilify for patients who will be experiencing conditions which may contribute to an elevation in core body temperature, (e.g., exercising strenuously, exposure to extreme heat, receiving concomitant medication with anticholinergic activity, or being subject to dehydration) [see ADVERSE REACTIONS (6.2)].

Suicide

The possibility of a suicide attempt is inherent in psychotic illnesses, bipolar disorder, and major depressive disorder, and close supervision of high-risk patients should accompany drug therapy. Prescriptions for Abilify should be written for the smallest quantity consistent with good patient management in order to reduce the risk of overdose [see ADVERSE REACTIONS (6.1, 6.2)].

Dysphagia

Esophageal dysmotility and aspiration have been associated with antipsychotic drug use, including Abilify. Aspiration pneumonia is a common cause of morbidity and mortality in elderly patients, in particular those with advanced Alzheimer’s dementia. Abilify and other antipsychotic drugs should be used cautiously in patients at risk for aspiration pneumonia [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS (5.1) and ADVERSE REACTIONS (6.2)].

Use in specific populations

Pregnancy

Pregnancy Category C

Pregnancy Exposure Registry

There is a pregnancy exposure registry that monitors pregnancy outcomes in women exposed to Abilify during pregnancy. For more information contact the National Pregnancy Registry for Atypical Antipsychotics at 1-866-961-2388 or visit http://womensmentalhealth.org/clinical-and-research-programs/pregnancyregistry/.

Risk Summary

Neonates exposed to antipsychotic drugs (including Abilify) during the third trimester of pregnancy are at risk for extrapyramidal and/or withdrawal symptoms. Adequate and well controlled studies with Abilify have not been conducted in pregnant women. Animal reproduction studies were conducted with aripiprazole in rats and rabbits during organogenesis, and in rats during the pre-and post-natal period. Oral and intravenous aripiprazole administration during organogenesis in rats and/or rabbits at doses higher than the maximum recommended human dose (MRHD) produced fetal death, decreased fetal weight, undescended testicles, delayed skeletal ossification, skeletal abnormalities, and diaphragmatic hernia. Oral and intravenous aripiprazole administration during the pre- and post-natal period in rats at doses higher than the maximum recommended human dose (MRHD) produced prolonged gestation, stillbirths, decreased pup weight, and decreased pup survival. Administer Abilify during pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus.

Clinical Considerations

Fetal/Neonatal Adverse Reactions

Extrapyramidal and/or withdrawal symptoms, including agitation, hypertonia, hypotonia, tremor, somnolence, respiratory distress and feeding disorder have been reported in neonates who were exposed to antipsychotic drugs (including Abilify) during the third trimester of pregnancy. These symptoms have varied in severity. Some neonates recovered within hours or days without specific treatment; others required prolonged hospitalization. Monitor neonates for extrapyramidal and/or withdrawal symptoms.

Data

Animal Data

In animal studies, aripiprazole demonstrated developmental toxicity, including possible teratogenic effects in rats and rabbits.

Pregnant rats were treated with oral doses of 3, 10, and 30 mg/kg/day (1, 3, and 10 times the maximum recommended human dose [MRHD] on a mg/m2 basis) of aripiprazole during the period of organogenesis. Gestation was slightly prolonged at 30 mg/kg/day. Treatment at the high dose of 30 mg/kg/day caused a slight delay in fetal development (decreased fetal weight), undescended testes, and delayed skeletal ossification (also seen at 10 mg/kg/day). There were no adverse effects on embryofetal or pup survival. Delivered offspring had decreased body weights (10 and 30 mg/kg/day), and increased incidences of hepatodiaphragmatic nodules and diaphragmatic hernia at 30 mg/kg (the other dose groups were not examined for these findings). Postnatally, delayed vaginal opening was seen at 10 and 30 mg/kg/day and impaired reproductive performance (decreased fertility rate, corpora lutea, implants, live fetuses, and increased post-implantation loss, likely mediated through effects on female offspring) was seen at 30 mg/kg/day. Some maternal toxicity was seen at 30 mg/kg/day however, there was no evidence to suggest that these developmental effects were secondary to maternal toxicity.

In pregnant rats receiving aripiprazole injection intravenously (3, 9, and 27 mg/kg/day) during the period of organogenesis, decreased fetal weight and delayed skeletal ossification were seen at the highest dose where it also caused maternal toxicity.

Pregnant rabbits were treated with oral doses of 10, 30, and 100 mg/kg/day (2, 3, and 11 times human exposure at MRHD based on AUC and 6, 19, and 65 times the MRHD based on mg/m2) of aripiprazole during the period of organogenesis. At the high dose of 100 mg/kg/day decreased maternal food consumption, and increased abortions were seen as well as increased fetal mortality, decreased fetal weight (also seen at 30 mg/kg/day), increased incidence of a skeletal abnormality (fused sternebrae) (also seen at 30 mg/kg/day).

In pregnant rabbits receiving aripiprazole injection intravenously (3, 10, and 30 mg/kg/day) during the period of organogenesis, the highest dose, which caused pronounced maternal toxicity, resulted in decreased fetal weight, increased fetal abnormalities (primarily skeletal), and decreased fetal skeletal ossification. The fetal no-effect dose was 10 mg/kg/day, which is 5 times the human exposure at the MRHD based on AUC and is 6 times the MRHD based on mg/m2.

In a study in which rats were treated peri- and post-natally with oral doses of 3, 10, and 30 mg/kg/day (1, 3, and 10 times the MRHD on a mg/m2 basis) of aripiprazole from gestation day 17 through day 21 postpartum, slight maternal toxicity, slightly prolonged gestation an increase in stillbirths and, decreases in pup weight (persisting into adulthood) and survival were seen at 30 mg/kg/day.

In rats receiving aripiprazole injection intravenously (3, 8, and 20 mg/kg/day) from gestation day 6 through day 20 postpartum, an increase in stillbirths was seen at 8 and 20 mg/kg/day, and decreases in early postnatal pup weights and survival were seen at 20 mg/kg/day; these effects were seen in presence of maternal toxicity. There were no effects on postnatal behavioral and reproductive development.

Labor and Delivery

The effect of Abilify on labor and delivery in humans is unknown.

Nursing Mothers

Abilify is present in human breast milk. Because of the potential for serious adverse reactions in nursing infants from Abilify, a decision should be made whether to discontinue nursing or to discontinue the drug, taking into account the importance of the drug to the mother.

Pediatric Use

Safety and effectiveness in pediatric patients with major depressive disorder or agitation associated with schizophrenia or bipolar mania have not been established.

The pharmacokinetics of aripiprazole and dehydro-aripiprazole in pediatric patients, 10 to 17 years of age, were similar to those in adults after correcting for the differences in body weight [see CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY (12.3)].

Schizophrenia

Safety and effectiveness in pediatric patients with schizophrenia were established in a 6‑week, placebo-controlled clinical trial in 202 pediatric patients aged 13 to 17 years [see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION (2.1), ADVERSE REACTIONS (6.1), and CLINICAL STUDIES (14.1)]. Although maintenance efficacy in pediatric patients has not been systematically evaluated, maintenance efficacy can be extrapolated from adult data along with comparisons of aripiprazole pharmacokinetic parameters in adult and pediatric patients.

Bipolar I Disorder

Safety and effectiveness in pediatric patients with bipolar mania were established in a 4‑week, placebo-controlled clinical trial in 197 pediatric patients aged 10 to 17 years [see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION (2.2), ADVERSE REACTIONS (6.1), andCLINICAL STUDIES (14.2)]. Although maintenance efficacy in pediatric patients has not been systematically evaluated, maintenance efficacy can be extrapolated from adult data along with comparisons of aripiprazole pharmacokinetic parameters in adult and pediatric patients.

The efficacy of adjunctive Abilify with concomitant lithium or valproate in the treatment of manic or mixed episodes in pediatric patients has not been systematically evaluated. However, such efficacy and lack of pharmacokinetic interaction between aripiprazole and lithium or valproate can be extrapolated from adult data, along with comparisons of aripiprazole pharmacokinetic parameters in adult and pediatric patients.

Irritability Associated with Autistic Disorder

Safety and effectiveness in pediatric patients demonstrating irritability associated with autistic disorder were established in two 8-week, placebo-controlled clinical trials in 212 pediatric patients aged 6 to 17 years [see INDICATIONS AND USAGE (1),DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION (2.4), ADVERSE REACTIONS (6.1), andCLINICAL STUDIES  (14.4)]. A maintenance trial was conducted in pediatric patients (6 to 17 years of age) with irritability associated with autistic disorder. The first phase of this trial was an open-label, flexibly dosed (aripiprazole 2 to 15 mg/day) phase in which patients were stabilized (defined as > 25% improvement on the ABC-I subscale, and a CGI-I rating of “much improved” or “very much improved”) on Abilify for 12 consecutive weeks. Overall, 85 patients were stabilized and entered the second, 16-week, double-blind phase where they were randomized to either continue Abilify treatment or switch to placebo. In this trial, the efficacy of Abilify for the maintenance treatment of irritability associated with autistic disorder was not established.

Tourette’s Disorder

Safety and effectiveness of aripiprazole in pediatric patients with Tourette’s Disorder were established in one 8-week (aged 7 to 17) and one 10-week trial (aged 6 to 18) in 194 pediatric patients [see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION (2.5), ADVERSE REACTIONS (6.1), and CLINICAL STUDIES (14.5)]. Maintenance efficacy in pediatric patients has not been systematically evaluated.

Juvenile Animal Studies

Aripiprazole in juvenile rats caused mortality, CNS clinical signs, impaired memory and learning, and delayed sexual maturation when administered at oral doses of 10, 20, 40 mg/kg/day from weaning (21 days old) through maturity (80 days old). At 40 mg/kg/day, mortality, decreased activity, splayed hind limbs, hunched posture, ataxia, tremors and other CNS signs were observed in both genders. In addition, delayed sexual maturation was observed in males. At all doses and in a dose-dependent manner, impaired memory and learning, increased motor activity, and histopathology changes in the pituitary (atrophy), adrenals (adrenocortical hypertrophy), mammary glands (hyperplasia and increased secretion), and female reproductive organs (vaginal mucification, endometrial atrophy, decrease in ovarian corpora lutea) were observed. The changes in female reproductive organs were considered secondary to the increase in prolactin serum levels. A No Observed Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL) could not be determined and, at the lowest tested dose of 10 mg/kg/day, there is no safety margin relative to the systemic exposures (AUC0-24) for aripiprazole or its major active metabolite in adolescents at the maximum recommended pediatric dose of 15 mg/day. All drug-related effects were reversible after a 2-month recovery period, and most of the drug effects in juvenile rats were also observed in adult rats from previously conducted studies.

Aripiprazole in juvenile dogs (2 months old) caused CNS clinical signs of tremors, hypoactivity, ataxia, recumbency and limited use of hind limbs when administered orally for 6 months at 3, 10, 30 mg/kg/day. Mean body weight and weight gain were decreased up to 18% in females in all drug groups relative to control values. A NOAEL could not be determined and, at the lowest tested dose of 3 mg/kg/day, there is no safety margin relative to the systemic exposures (AUC0-24) for aripiprazole or its major active metabolite in adolescents at the maximum recommended pediatric dose of 15 mg/day. All drug-related effects were reversible after a 2-month recovery period.

Geriatric Use

No dosage adjustment is recommended for elderly patients [see BOXED WARNING, WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS (5.1), and CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY (12.3)].

Of the 13,543 patients treated with oral Abilify in clinical trials, 1073 (8%) were ≥65 years old and 799 (6%) were ≥75 years old. Placebo-controlled studies of oral Abilify in schizophrenia, bipolar mania, or major depressive disorder did not include sufficient numbers of subjects aged 65 and over to determine whether they respond differently from younger subjects.

Of the 749 patients treated with Abilify injection in clinical trials, 99 (13%) were ≥65 years old and 78 (10%) were ≥75 years old. Placebo-controlled studies of Abilify injection in patients with agitation associated with schizophrenia or bipolar mania did not include sufficient numbers of subjects aged 65 and over to determine whether they respond differently from younger subjects.

Abilify is not approved for the treatment of patients with psychosis associated with Alzheimer’s disease [see BOXED WARNING and WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS (5.1)].

CYP2D6 Poor Metabolizers

Dosage adjustment is recommended in known CYP2D6 poor metabolizers due to high aripiprazole concentrations. Approximately 8% of Caucasians and 3–8% of Black/African Americans cannot metabolize CYP2D6 substrates and are classified as poor metabolizers (PM) [see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION (2.7) and CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY (12.3)].

Hepatic and Renal Impairment

No dosage adjustment for Abilify is required on the basis of a patient’s hepatic function (mild to severe hepatic impairment, Child-Pugh score between 5 and 15), or renal function (mild to severe renal impairment, glomerular filtration rate between 15 and 90 mL/minute) [see CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY (12.3)].

Other Specific Populations

No dosage adjustment for Abilify is required on the basis of a patient’s sex, race, or smoking status [see CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY (12.3)].

Abilify - Clinical Pharmacology

Mechanism of Action

The mechanism of action of aripiprazole in schizophrenia or bipolar mania, is unknown. However, the efficacy of aripiprazole could be mediated through a combination of partial agonist activity at D2 and 5-HT1A receptors and antagonist activity at 5-HT2A receptors. Actions at receptors other than D2, 5-HT1A, and 5-HT2A may explain some of the other clinical effects of aripiprazole (e.g., the orthostatic hypotension observed with aripiprazole may be explained by its antagonist activity at adrenergic alpha1 receptors).

Pharmacodynamics

Aripiprazole exhibits high affinity for dopamine D2 and D3, serotonin 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors (Ki values of 0.34 nM, 0.8 nM, 1.7 nM, and 3.4 nM, respectively), moderate affinity for dopamine D4, serotonin 5-HT2C and 5-HT7, alpha1-adrenergic and histamine H1 receptors (Ki values of 44 nM, 15 nM, 39 nM, 57 nM, and 61 nM, respectively), and moderate affinity for the serotonin reuptake site (Ki=98 nM). Aripiprazole has no appreciable affinity for cholinergic muscarinic receptors (IC50>1000 nM). [Aripiprazole functions as a partial agonist at the dopamine D2 and the serotonin 5-HT1A receptors, and as an antagonist at serotonin 5-HT2A receptor.]

Pharmacokinetics

Abilify activity is presumably primarily due to the parent drug, aripiprazole, and to a lesser extent, to its major metabolite, dehydro-aripiprazole, which has been shown to have affinities for D2 receptors similar to the parent drug and represents 40% of the parent drug exposure in plasma. The mean elimination half-lives are about 75 hours and 94 hours for aripiprazole and dehydro-aripiprazole, respectively. Steady-state concentrations are attained within 14 days of dosing for both active moieties. Aripiprazole accumulation is predictable from single-dose pharmacokinetics. At steady-state, the pharmacokinetics of aripiprazole is dose-proportional. Elimination of aripiprazole is mainly through hepatic metabolism involving two P450 isozymes, CYP2D6 and CYP3A4. For CYP2D6 poor metabolizers, the mean elimination half-life for aripiprazole is about 146 hours.

Pharmacokinetic studies showed that Abilify DISCMELT Orally Disintegrating Tablets are bioequivalent to Abilify Tablets.

ORAL ADMINISTRATION Absorption

Tablet: Aripiprazole is well absorbed after administration of the tablet, with peak plasma concentrations occurring within 3 hours to 5 hours; the absolute oral bioavailability of the tablet formulation is 87%. Abilify can be administered with or without food. Administration of a 15 mg Abilify Tablet with a standard high-fat meal did not significantly affect the Cmax or AUC of aripiprazole or its active metabolite, dehydro-aripiprazole, but delayed Tmax by 3 hours for aripiprazole and 12 hours for dehydro-aripiprazole.

Oral Solution: Aripiprazole is well absorbed when administered orally as the solution. At equivalent doses, the plasma concentrations of aripiprazole from the solution were higher than that from the tablet formulation. In a relative bioavailability study comparing the pharmacokinetics of 30 mg aripiprazole as the oral solution to 30 mg aripiprazole tablets in healthy subjects, the solution to tablet ratios of geometric mean Cmax and AUC values were 122% and 114%, respectively [see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION (2.6)]. The single-dose pharmacokinetics of aripiprazole were linear and dose-proportional between the doses of 5 mg to 30 mg.

Distribution

The steady-state volume of distribution of aripiprazole following intravenous administration is high (404 L or 4.9 L/kg), indicating extensive extravascular distribution. At therapeutic concentrations, aripiprazole and its major metabolite are greater than 99% bound to serum proteins, primarily to albumin. In healthy human volunteers administered 0.5 to 30 mg/day aripiprazole for 14 days, there was dose-dependent D2 receptor occupancy indicating brain penetration of aripiprazole in humans.

Metabolism and Elimination

Aripiprazole is metabolized primarily by three biotransformation pathways: dehydrogenation, hydroxylation, and N-dealkylation. Based on in vitro studies, CYP3A4 and CYP2D6 enzymes are responsible for dehydrogenation and hydroxylation of aripiprazole, and N-dealkylation is catalyzed by CYP3A4. Aripiprazole is the predominant drug moiety in the systemic circulation. At steady-state, dehydro-aripiprazole, the active metabolite, represents about 40% of aripiprazole AUC in plasma.

Following a single oral dose of [14C]-labeled aripiprazole, approximately 25% and 55% of the administered radioactivity was recovered in the urine and feces, respectively. Less than 1% of unchanged aripiprazole was excreted in the urine and approximately 18% of the oral dose was recovered unchanged in the feces.

Drug Interaction Studies

Effects of other drugs on the exposures of aripiprazole and dehydro-aripiprazole are summarized in Figure 1 and Figure 2, respectively. Based on simulation, a 4.5-fold increase in mean Cmax and AUC values at steady-state is expected when extensive metabolizers of CYP2D6 are administered with both strong CYP2D6 and CYP3A4 inhibitors. A 3-fold increase in mean Cmax and AUC values at steady-state is expected in poor metabolizers of CYP2D6 administered with strong CYP3A4 inhibitors.

Figure 1: The effects of other drugs on aripiprazole pharmacokinetics

Figure 2: The effects of other drugs on dehydro-aripiprazole pharmacokinetics

The effects of Abilify on the exposures of other drugs are summarized in Figure 3. A population PK analysis in patients with major depressive disorder showed no substantial change in plasma concentrations of fluoxetine (20 or 40 mg/day), paroxetine CR (37.5 or 50 mg/day), or sertraline (100 or 150 mg/day) dosed to steady-state. The steady-state plasma concentrations of fluoxetine and norfluoxetine increased by about 18% and 36%, respectively, and concentrations of paroxetine decreased by about 27%. The steady-state plasma concentrations of sertraline and desmethylsertraline were not substantially changed when these antidepressant therapies were coadministered with aripiprazole.

Figure 3: The effects of Abilify on pharmacokinetics of other drugs

Studies in Specific Populations

Exposures of aripiprazole and dehydro-aripiprazole in specific populations are summarized in Figure 4 and Figure 5, respectively. In addition, in pediatric patients (10 to 17 years of age) administered with Abilify (20 mg to 30 mg), the body weight corrected aripiprazole clearance was similar to the adults.

Figure 4: Effects of intrinsic factors on aripiprazole pharmacokinetics

Figure 5: Effects of intrinsic factors on dehydro-aripiprazole pharmacokinetics

INTRAMUSCULAR ADMINISTRATION

In two pharmacokinetic studies of aripiprazole injection administered intramuscularly to healthy subjects, the median times to the peak plasma concentrations were at 1 hour and 3 hours. A 5 mg intramuscular injection of aripiprazole had an absolute bioavailability of 100%. The geometric mean maximum concentration achieved after an intramuscular dose was on average 19% higher than the Cmax of the oral tablet. While the systemic exposure over 24 hours was generally similar between aripiprazole injection given intramuscularly and after oral tablet administration, the aripiprazole AUC in the first 2 hours after an intramuscular injection was 90% greater than the AUC after the same dose as a tablet. In stable patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder, the pharmacokinetics of aripiprazole after intramuscular administration were linear over a dose range of 1 mg to 45 mg. Although the metabolism of aripiprazole injection was not systematically evaluated, the intramuscular route of administration would not be expected to alter the metabolic pathways.

How Supplied/Storage and Handling

How Supplied

Abilify® (aripiprazole) Tablets have markings on one side and are available in the strengths and packages listed in Table 32.

Table 32: Abilify Tablet Presentations

Tablet

Strength

Tablet

Color/Shape

Tablet

Markings

Pack

Size

NDC

Code

2 mg

green

modified rectangle

“A-006”

and “2”

Bottle of 30

59148-006-13

5 mg

blue

modified rectangle

“A-007”

and “5”

Bottle of 30

Blister of 100

59148-007-13

59148-007-35

10 mg

pink

modified rectangle

“A-008”

and “10”

Bottle of 30

Blister of 100

59148-008-13

59148-008-35

15 mg

yellow

round

“A-009”

and “15”

Bottle of 30

Blister of 100

59148-009-13

59148-009-35

20 mg

white

round

“A-010”

and “20”

Bottle of 30

Blister of 100

59148-010-13

59148-010-35

30 mg

pink

round

“A-011”

and “30”

Bottle of 30

Blister of 100

59148-011-13

59148-011-35

Abilify DISCMELT® (aripiprazole) Orally Disintegrating Tablets are round tablets with markings on either side. Abilify DISCMELT is available in the strengths and packages listed in Table 33.

Table 33: Abilify DISCMELT Orally Disintegrating Tablet Presentations

Tablet

Strength

Tablet

Color

Tablet

Markings

Pack

Size

NDC

Code

10 mg

pink (with

scattered specks)

“A” and “640”

“10”

Blister of 30

59148-640-23

15 mg

yellow (with

scattered specks)

“A” and “641”

“15”

Blister of 30

59148-641-23

Abilify® (aripiprazole) Oral Solution (1 mg/mL) is supplied in child-resistant bottles along with a calibrated oral dosing cup. Abilify Oral Solution is available as follows:

  150 mL bottle NDC 59148-013-15

Abilify® (aripiprazole) Injection for intramuscular use is available as a ready-to-use, 9.75 mg/1.3 mL (7.5 mg/mL) solution in clear, Type 1 glass vials as follows:

  9.75 mg/1.3 mL single-dose vial NDC 59148-016-65

Storage

Tablets

Store at 25°C (77°F); excursions permitted between 15°C to 30°C (59°F to 86°F) [see USP Controlled Room Temperature].

Oral Solution

Store at 25°C (77°F); excursions permitted between 15°C to 30°C (59°F to 86°F) [see USP Controlled Room Temperature]. Opened bottles of Abilify Oral Solution can be used for up to 6 months after opening, but not beyond the expiration date on the bottle. The bottle and its contents should be discarded after the expiration date.

Injection

Store at 25ºC (77°F); excursions permitted between 15°C to 30°C (59°F to 86°F) [see USP Controlled Room Temperature]. Protect from light by storing in the original container. Retain in carton until time of use.

What are the uses for Abilify?

Aripiprazole is used for the treatment of:

  • Schizophrenia
  • Bipolar disorder
  • Irritability associated with autistic disorder
  • Tourette's disorder
  • Major depression in adults (along with other medications used for the treatment of depression)
  • Mixed manic/depressive episodes (as sole or adjunctive therapy) and as adjunctive (add-on) therapy for major depressive disorder
  • Agitation associated with schizophrenia or bipolar mania.

What else should I know about this drug?

  • Preparations of this medicine include:
    • Tablets in doses of 2, 5 10, 15, 20, and 30 mg.
    • Disintegrating tablets in doses of 10 and 15 mg.
    • Oral solution dose of 1 mg/mL
    • Injection solution dosages of 9.75 mg/1.3 ml (7.5 mg/ml)
    • Extended Release Injection, Abilify Maintana, in doses of 300 or 400 mg/vial
    • Extended Release Prefilled Syringe, Aristrada), in doses of 441, 662, and 882 mg.
  • Tablets, oral solution, and injection should be stored at room temperature, 15 C to 30 C (59 F to 86 F).
  • The FDA approved aripiprazole in November 2002.

What should I know about storage and disposal of this medication?

Keep this medication in the container it came in, tightly closed, and out of reach of children. Store the tablets, the solution, and the orally disintegrating tablets at room temperature and away from excess heat and moisture (not in the bathroom). Always store the orally disintegrating tablets in their sealed package, and use them immediately after opening the package. Dispose of any unused aripiprazole solution 6 months after you open the bottle or when the expiration date marked on the bottle has passed, whichever is sooner.

Unneeded medications should be disposed of in special ways to ensure that pets, children, and other people cannot consume them. However, you should not flush this medication down the toilet. Instead, the best way to dispose of your medication is through a medicine take-back program. Talk to your pharmacist or contact your local garbage/recycling department to learn about take-back programs in your community. See the FDA's Safe Disposal of Medicines website (http://goo.gl/c4Rm4p) for more information if you do not have access to a take-back program.

It is important to keep all medication out of sight and reach of children as many containers (such as weekly pill minders and those for eye drops, creams, patches, and inhalers) are not child-resistant and young children can open them easily. To protect young children from poisoning, always lock safety caps and immediately place the medication in a safe location – one that is up and away and out of their sight and reach. http://www.upandaway.org

In case of emergency/overdose

In case of overdose, call your local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. If the victim has collapsed or is not breathing, call local emergency services at 911.

Symptoms of overdose may include the following:

  • drowsiness
  • weakness
  • widened pupils (black circles in the middle of the eyes)
  • nausea
  • vomiting
  • changes in heartbeat
  • movements that you cannot control
  • confusion
  • seizures
  • loss of consciousness

Getting the most from your treatment

  • Your treatment will require careful monitoring to make sure that you get the best possible benefit from aripiprazole. Keep your regular doctor's appointments so that your progress can be checked. You will need to have some tests from time to time.
  • Treatment with aripiprazole is usually long-term unless you experience an adverse effect. Keep taking it unless your doctor tells you otherwise. Stopping aripiprazole suddenly can cause problems so your doctor may want you to reduce your dose gradually if this becomes necessary.
  • If you drink alcohol, ask your doctor for advice. Alcohol increases the risk of side-effects, so it is generally best avoided.
  • If you have diabetes you may need to check your blood glucose more frequently, as aripiprazole may affect the levels of sugar in your blood. Your doctor will advise you about this.
  • Some medicines similar to aripiprazole can cause the skin to become more sensitive to sunlight than normal. It may be advisable to use a sunscreen in bright sunlight until you know how your skin reacts.
  • If you are having an operation, tell the person carrying out the treatment which medicines you are taking. This is important because aripiprazole may interfere with any anaesthetic you receive.
  • If you buy or take any 'over-the-counter' medicines, check with a pharmacist that they are suitable for you to take with aripiprazole.
  • A small number of people taking medicines for mood disorders can have thoughts about harming themselves or ending their lives. It is very important that you tell your doctor about this if it happens to you.
  • Treatment with medicines like aripiprazole can sometimes cause problems with impulsive types of behaviour. If you notice any changes in your behaviour, such as an increased desire to gamble, you must let your doctor know as soon as possible.

Manufacturer

  • Otsuka America Pharmaceutical, Inc.

Abilify Usage

Oral:

  • Take Abilify exactly as prescribed. Do not change the dose or stop taking Abilify without talking to your doctor.
  • Abilify is available in a tablet and oral solution.
  • Abilify can be taken with or without food.
  • Swallow Abilify tablets whole.
  • If you miss a dose of Abilify, take it as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for the next dose, just skip the missed dose and take your next dose at the regular time. Do not take two doses of Abilify at the same time.

Immediate-Release Injectable:

  • This medication is also available in an immediate-release injectable forms to be given directly into the muscle (IM) by a healthcare professional.

Abilify FDA Warning

Talk to your doctor or your pharmacist about the following black box warning for this medication:

WARNINGS: INCREASED MORTALITY IN ELDERLY PATIENTS WITH DEMENTIA-RELATED PSYCHOSIS and SUICIDALITY AND ANTIDEPRESSANT DRUGS

Elderly patients with dementia-related psychosis treated with antipsychotic drugs are at an increased risk of death. Analyses of seventeen placebo-controlled trials (modal duration of 10 weeks), largely in patients taking atypical antipsychotic drugs, revealed a risk of death in drug-treated patients of between 1.6 to 1.7 times the risk of death in placebo-treated patients. Over the course of a typical 10-week controlled trial, the rate of death in drug-treated patients was about 4.5%, compared to a rate of about 2.6% in the placebo group. Although the causes of death were varied, most of the deaths appeared to be either cardiovascular (eg, heart failure, sudden death) or infectious (eg, pneumonia) in nature. Observational studies suggest that, similar to atypical antipsychotic drugs, treatment with conventional antipsychotic drugs may increase mortality. The extent to which the findings of increased mortality in observational studies may be attributed to the antipsychotic drug as opposed to some characteristic(s) of the patients is not clear. Abilify is not approved for the treatment of patients with dementia-related psychosis.

Antidepressants increased the risk compared to placebo of suicidal thinking and behavior (suicidality) in children, adolescents, and young adults in short-term studies of major depressive disorder (MDD) and other psychiatric disorders. Anyone considering the use of adjunctive Abilify or any other antidepressant in a child, adolescent, or young adult must balance this risk with the clinical need. Short-term studies did not show an increase in the risk of suicidality with antidepressants compared to placebo in adults beyond age 24; there was a reduction in risk with antidepressants compared to placebo in adults aged 65 and older. Depression and certain other psychiatric disorders are themselves associated with increases in the risk of suicide. Patients of all ages who are started on antidepressant therapy should be monitored appropriately and observed closely for clinical worsening, suicidality, or unusual changes in behavior. Families and caregivers should be advised of the need for close observation and communication with the prescriber. Abilify is not approved for use in pediatric patients with depression.

What is the most important information i should know about aripiprazole (abilify, abilify discmelt)?

Aripiprazole is not for use in psychotic conditions that are related to dementia. Aripiprazole may cause heart failure, sudden death, or pneumonia in older adults with dementia-related conditions.

Stop using aripiprazole and call your doctor at once if you have the following symptoms: fever with stiff muscles and rapid heart rate; uncontrolled muscle movements; symptoms that come on suddenly such as numbness or weakness, severe headache, and problems with vision, speech, or balance.

Aripiprazole may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert.

Avoid drinking alcohol, which can increase some of the side effects of aripiprazole.

Before you take aripiprazole, tell your doctor if you regularly use other medicines that make you sleepy (such as cold or allergy medicine, narcotic pain medicine, sleeping pills, muscle relaxers, and medicine for seizures, depression, or anxiety). They can add to sleepiness caused by aripiprazole.

Avoid becoming overheated or dehydrated. Drink plenty of fluids, especially in hot weather and during exercise. It is easier to become dangerously overheated and dehydrated while you are taking aripiprazole.

Side effects

Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in practice.

The following adverse reactions are discussed in more detail in other sections of the labeling:

  • Increased Mortality in Elderly Patients with Dementia-Related Psychosis [see BOXED WARNING and WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS]
  • Cerebrovascular Adverse Events, Including Stroke [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS]
  • Suicidal Thoughts and Behaviors in Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults [see BOXED WARNING and WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS]
  • Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome (NMS) [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS]
  • Tardive Dyskinesia [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS]
  • Metabolic Changes [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS]
  • Pathological Gambling and Other Compulsive Behaviors [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS]
  • Orthostatic Hypotension [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS]
  • Leukopenia, Neutropenia, and Agranulocytosis [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS]
  • Seizures/Convulsions [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS]
  • Potential for Cognitive and Motor Impairment [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS]
  • Body Temperature Regulation [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS]
  • Suicide [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS]
  • Dysphagia [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS]

The most common adverse reactions in adult patients in clinical trials ( ≥ 10%) were nausea, vomiting, constipation, headache, dizziness, akathisia, anxiety, insomnia, and restlessness.

The most common adverse reactions in the pediatric clinical trials ( ≥ 10%) were somnolence, headache, vomiting, extrapyramidal disorder, fatigue, increased appetite, insomnia, nausea, nasopharyngitis, and weight increased.

ABILIFY has been evaluated for safety in 13,543 adult patients who participated in multiple-dose, clinical trials in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder, Dementia of the Alzheimer's type, Parkinson's disease, and alcoholism, and who had approximately 7619 patient-years of exposure to oral ABILIFY and 749 patients with exposure to ABILIFY injection. A total of 3390 patients were treated with oral ABILIFY for at least 180 days and 1933 patients treated with oral ABILIFY had at least 1 year of exposure.

ABILIFY has been evaluated for safety in 1,686 patients (6 to 18 years) who participated in multiple-dose, clinical trials in schizophrenia, bipolar mania, autistic disorder, or Tourette's disorder and who had approximately 1,342 patient-years of exposure to oral ABILIFY. A total of 959 pediatric patients were treated with oral ABILIFY for at least 180 days and 556 pediatric patients treated with oral ABILIFY had at least 1 year of exposure.

The conditions and duration of treatment with ABILIFY (monotherapy and adjunctive therapy with antidepressants or mood stabilizers) included (in overlapping categories) double-blind, comparative and noncomparative open-label studies, inpatient and outpatient studies, fixed-and flexible-dose studies, and short-and longer-term exposure.

Clinical Trials Experience

Adult Patients With Schizophrenia

The following findings are based on a pool of five placebo-controlled trials (four 4-week and one 6-week) in which oral ABILIFY was administered in doses ranging from 2 to 30 mg/day.

Commonly Observed Adverse Reactions

The only commonly observed adverse reaction associated with the use of ABILIFY in patients with schizophrenia (incidence of 5% or greater and

ABILIFY incidence at least twice that for placebo) was akathisia (ABILIFY 8%; placebo 4%).

Adult Patients With Bipolar Mania

Monotherapy

The following findings are based on a pool of 3-week, placebo-controlled, bipolar mania trials in which oral ABILIFY was administered at doses of 15 or 30 mg/day.

Commonly Observed Adverse Reactions

Commonly observed adverse reactions associated with the use of ABILIFY in patients with bipolar mania (incidence of 5% or greater and ABILIFY incidence at least twice that for placebo) are shown in Table 16.

Table 16: Commonly Observed Adverse Reactions in Short-Term, Placebo-Controlled Trials of Adult Patients with Bipolar Mania Treated with Oral ABILIFY Monotherapy

Preferred Term Percentage of Patients Reporting Reaction
ABILIFY
(n=917)
Placebo
(n=753)
Akathisia 13 4
Sedation 8 3
Restlessness 6 3
Tremor 6 3
Extrapyramidal Disorder 5 2

Less Common Adverse Reactions In Adults

Table 17 enumerates the pooled incidence, rounded to the nearest percent, of adverse reactions that occurred during acute therapy (up to 6 weeks in schizophrenia and up to 3 weeks in bipolar mania), including only those reactions that occurred in 2% or more of patients treated with ABILIFY (doses ≥ 2 mg/day) and for which the incidence in patients treated with ABILIFY was greater than the incidence in patients treated with placebo in the combined dataset.

Table 17: Adverse Reactions in Short-Term, Placebo-Controlled Trials in Adult Patients Treated with Oral ABILIFY

System Organ Class
Preferred Term
Percentage of Patients Reporting Reactiona
ABILIFY
(n=1843)
Placebo
(n=1166)
Eye Disorders
  Blurred Vision 3 1
Gastrointestinal Disorders
  Nausea 15 11
  Constipation 11 7
  Vomiting 11 6
  Dyspepsia 9 7
  Dry Mouth 5 4
  Toothache 4 3
  Abdominal Discomfort 3 2
  Stomach Discomfort 3 2
General Disorders and Administration Site Conditions
  Fatigue 6 4
  Pain 3 2
Musculoskeletal and Connective Tissue Disorders
  Musculoskeletal Stiffness 4 3
  Pain in Extremity 4 2
  Myalgia 2 1
  Muscle Spasms 2 1
Nervous System Disorders
  Headache 27 23
  Dizziness 10 7
  Akathisia 10 4
  Sedation 7 4
  Extrapyramidal Disorder 5 3
  Tremor 5 3
  Somnolence 5 3
Psychiatric Disorders
  Agitation 19 17
  Insomnia 18 13
  Anxiety 17 13
  Restlessness 5 3
Respiratory, Thoracic, and Mediastinal Disorders
  Pharyngolaryngeal Pain 3 2
  Cough 3 2
a Adverse reactions reported by at least 2% of patients treated with oral ABILIFY, except adverse reactions which had an incidence equal to or less than placebo.

An examination of population subgroups did not reveal any clear evidence of differential adverse reaction incidence on the basis of age, gender, or race.

Adult Patients With Adjunctive Therapy With Bipolar Mania

The following findings are based on a placebo-controlled trial of adult patients with bipolar disorder in which ABILIFY was administered at doses of 15 or 30 mg/day as adjunctive therapy with lithium or valproate.

Adverse Reactions Associated with Discontinuation of Treatment

In a study of patients who were already tolerating either lithium or valproate as monotherapy, discontinuation rates due to adverse reactions were 12% for patients treated with adjunctive ABILIFY compared to 6% for patients treated with adjunctive placebo. The most common adverse drug reactions associated with discontinuation in the adjunctive ABILIFY-treated compared to placebo-treated patients were akathisia (5% and 1%, respectively) and tremor (2% and 1%, respectively).

Commonly Observed Adverse Reactions

The commonly observed adverse reactions associated with adjunctive ABILIFY and lithium or valproate in patients with bipolar mania (incidence of 5% or greater and incidence at least twice that for adjunctive placebo) were: akathisia, insomnia, and extrapyramidal disorder.

Less Common Adverse Reactions In Adult Patients With Adjunctive Therapy In Bipolar Mania

Table 18 enumerates the incidence, rounded to the nearest percent, of adverse reactions that occurred during acute treatment (up to 6 weeks), including only those reactions that occurred in 2% or more of patients treated with adjunctive ABILIFY (doses of 15 or 30 mg/day) and lithium or valproate and for which the incidence in patients treated with this combination was greater than the incidence in patients treated with placebo plus lithium or valproate.

Table 18: Adverse Reactions in a Short-Term, Placebo-Controlled Trial of Adjunctive Therapy in Patients with Bipolar Disorder

System Organ Class
Preferred Term
Percentage of Patients Reporting Reactiona
ABILIFY + Li or Val*
(n=253)
Placebo + Li or Val*
(n=130)
Gastrointestinal Disorders
  Nausea 8 5
  Vomiting 4 0
  Salivary Hypersecretion 4 2
  Dry Mouth 2 1
Infections and Infestations
  Nasopharyngitis 3 2
Investigations
  Weight Increased 2 1
Nervous System Disorders
  Akathisia 19 5
  Tremor 9 6
  Extrapyramidal Disorder 5 1
  Dizziness 4 1
  Sedation 4 2
Psychiatric Disorders
  Insomnia 8 4
  Anxiety 4 1
  Restlessness 2 1
a Adverse reactions reported by at least 2% of patients treated with oral ABILIFY, except adverse reactions which had an incidence equal to or less than placebo.
* Lithium or Valproate

Pediatric Patients (13 to 17 years) With Schizophrenia

The following findings are based on one 6-week, placebo-controlled trial in which oral ABILIFY was administered in doses ranging from 2 to 30 mg/day.

Adverse Reactions Associated with Discontinuation of Treatment

The incidence of discontinuation due to adverse reactions between ABILIFY-treated and placebo-treated pediatric patients (13 to 17 years) was 5% and 2%, respectively.

Commonly Observed Adverse Reactions

Commonly observed adverse reactions associated with the use of ABILIFY in adolescent patients with schizophrenia (incidence of 5% or greater and ABILIFY incidence at least twice that for placebo) were extrapyramidal disorder, somnolence, and tremor.

Pediatric Patients (10 to 17 years) With Bipolar Mania

The following findings are based on one 4-week, placebo-controlled trial in which oral ABILIFY was administered in doses of 10 or 30 mg/day.

Adverse Reactions Associated with Discontinuation of Treatment

The incidence of discontinuation due to adverse reactions between ABILIFY-treated and placebo-treated pediatric patients (10 to 17 years) was 7% and 2%, respectively.

Commonly Observed Adverse Reactions

Commonly observed adverse reactions associated with the use of ABILIFY in pediatric patients with bipolar mania (incidence of 5% or greater and ABILIFY incidence at least twice that for placebo) are shown in Table 19.

Table 19: Commonly Observed Adverse Reactions in Short- Term, Placebo-Controlled Trials of Pediatric Patients(10 to 17 years) with Bipolar Mania Treated with Oral ABILIFY

Preferred Term Percentage of Patients Reporting Reaction
ABILIFY
(n=197)
Placebo
(n=97)
Somnolence 23 3
Extrapyramidal Disorder 20 3
Fatigue 11 4
Nausea 11 4
Akathisia 10 2
Blurred Vision 8 0
Salivary Hypersecretion 6 0
Dizziness 5 1

Pediatric Patients (6 to 17 years) With Autistic Disorder

The following findings are based on two 8-week, placebo-controlled trials in which oral ABILIFY was administered in doses of 2 to 15 mg/day.

Adverse Reactions Associated with Discontinuation of Treatment

The incidence of discontinuation due to adverse reactions between ABILIFY-treated and placebo-treated pediatric patients (6 to 17 years) was 10% and 8%, respectively.

Commonly Observed Adverse Reactions

Commonly observed adverse reactions associated with the use of ABILIFY in pediatric patients with autistic disorder (incidence of 5% or greater and ABILIFY incidence at least twice that for placebo) are shown in Table 20.

Table 20: Commonly Observed Adverse Reactions in Short-Term, Placebo-Controlled Trials of Pediatric Patients (6 to 17 years) with Autistic Disorder Treated with Oral ABILIFY

Preferred Term Percentage of Patients Reporting Reaction
ABILIFY
(n=212)
Placebo
(n=101)
Sedation 21 4
Fatigue 17 2
Vomiting 14 7
Somnolence 10 4
Tremor 10 0
Pyrexia 9 1
Drooling 9 0
Decreased Appetite 7 2
Salivary Hypersecretion 6 1
Extrapyramidal Disorder 6 0
Lethargy 5 0

Pediatric Patients (6 to 18 years) With Tourette's Disorder

The following findings are based on one 8-week and one 10-week, placebo-controlled trials in which oral ABILIFY was administered in doses of 2 to 20 mg/day.

Adverse Reactions Associated with Discontinuation of Treatment

The incidence of discontinuation due to adverse reactions between ABILIFY-treated and placebo-treated pediatric patients (6 to 18 years) was 7% and 1%, respectively.

Commonly Observed Adverse Reactions

Commonly observed adverse reactions associated with the use of ABILIFY in pediatric patients with Tourette's disorder (incidence of 5% or greater and ABILIFY incidence at least twice that for placebo) are shown in Table 21.

Table 21: Commonly Observed Adverse Reactions in Short-Term, Placebo-Controlled Trials of Pediatric Patients (6 to 18 years) with Tourette's Disorder Treated with Oral ABILIFY

Preferred Term Percentage of Patients Reporting Reaction
ABILIFY
(n=121)
Placebo
(n=72)
Sedation 13 6
Somnolence 13 1
Nausea 11 4
Headache 10 3
Nasopharyngitis 9 0
Fatigue 8 0
Increased Appetite 7 1

Less Common Adverse Reactions In Pediatric Patients (6 to 18 years) With Schizophrenia, Bipolar Mania, Autistic Disorder, Or Tourette's Disorder

Table 22 enumerates the pooled incidence, rounded to the nearest percent, of adverse reactions that occurred during acute therapy (up to 6 weeks in schizophrenia, up to 4 weeks in bipolar mania, up to 8 weeks in autistic disorder, and up to 10 weeks in Tourette's disorder), including only those reactions that occurred in 2% or more of pediatric patients treated with ABILIFY (doses ≥ 2 mg/day) and for which the incidence in patients treated with ABILIFY was greater than the incidence in patients treated with placebo.

Table 22: Adverse Reactions in Short-Term, Placebo-Controlled Trials of Pediatric Patients (6 to 18 years) Treated with Oral ABILIFY

System Organ Class
Preferred Term
Percentage of Patients Reporting Reactiona
ABILIFY
(n=732)
Placebo
(n=370)
Eye Disorders
  Blurred Vision 3 0
Gastrointestinal Disorders
  Abdominal Discomfort 2 1
  Vomiting 8 7
  Nausea 8 4
  Diarrhea 4 3
  Salivary Hypersecretion 4 1
  Abdominal Pain Upper 3 2
  Constipation 2 2
General Disorders and Administration Site Conditions
  Fatigue 10 2
  Pyrexia 4 1
  Irritability 2 1
  Asthenia 2 1
Infections and Infestations
  Nasopharyngitis 6 3
  Investigations
  Weight Increased 3 1
Metabolism and Nutrition Disorders
  Increased Appetite 7 3
  Decreased Appetite 5 4
Musculoskeletal and Connective Tissue Disorders
  Musculoskeletal Stiffness 2 1
  Muscle Rigidity 2 1
Nervous System Disorders
  Somnolence 16 4
  Headache 12 10
  Sedation 9 2
  Tremor 9 1
  Extrapyramidal Disorder 6 1
  Akathisia 6 4
  Drooling 3 0
  Lethargy 3 0
  Dizziness 3 2
  Dystonia 2 1
Respiratory, Thoracic, and Mediastinal Disorders
  Epistaxis 2 1
Skin and Subcutaneous Tissue Disorders
  Rash 2 1
a Adverse reactions reported by at least 2% of pediatric patients treated with oral ABILIFY, except adverse reactions which had an incidence equal to or less than placebo.

Adult Patients Receiving ABILIFY As Adjunctive Treatment Of Major Depressive Disorder

The following findings are based on a pool of two placebo-controlled trials of patients with major depressive disorder in which ABILIFY was administered at doses of 2 mg to 20 mg as adjunctive treatment to continued antidepressant therapy.

Adverse Reactions Associated with Discontinuation of Treatment

The incidence of discontinuation due to adverse reactions was 6% for adjunctive ABILIFY-treated patients and 2% for adjunctive placebo-treated patients.

Commonly Observed Adverse Reactions

The commonly observed adverse reactions associated with the use of adjunctive ABILIFY in patients with major depressive disorder (incidence of 5% or greater and ABILIFY incidence at least twice that for placebo) were: akathisia, restlessness, insomnia, constipation, fatigue, and blurred vision.

Less Common Adverse Reactions in Adult Patients with Major Depressive Disorder

Table 23 enumerates the pooled incidence, rounded to the nearest percent, of adverse reactions that occurred during acute therapy (up to 6 weeks), including only those adverse reactions that occurred in 2% or more of patients treated with adjunctive ABILIFY (doses ≥ 2 mg/day) and for which the incidence in patients treated with adjunctive ABILIFY was greater than the incidence in patients treated with adjunctive placebo in the combined dataset.

Table 23: Adverse Reactions in Short-Term, Placebo-Controlled Adjunctive Trials in Patients with Major Depressive Disorder

System Organ Class
Preferred Term
Percentage of Patients Reporting Reactiona
ABILIFY + ADT*
(n=371)
Placebo + ADT*
(n=366)
Eye Disorders
  Blurred Vision 6 1
Gastrointestinal Disorders
  Constipation 5 2
General Disorders and Administration Site Conditions
  Fatigue 8 4
  Feeling Jittery 3 1
Infections and Infestations
  Upper Respiratory Tract Infection 6 4
Investigations
  Weight Increased 3 2
Metabolism and Nutrition Disorders
  Increased Appetite 3 2
Musculoskeletal and Connective Tissue Disorders
  Arthralgia 4 3
  Myalgia 3 1
Nervous System Disorders
  Akathisia 25 4
  Somnolence 6 4
  Tremor 5 4
  Sedation 4 2
  Dizziness 4 2
  Disturbance in Attention 3 1
  Extrapyramidal Disorder 2 0
Psychiatric Disorders
  Restlessness 12 2
  Insomnia 8 2
a Adverse reactions reported by at least 2% of patients treated with adjunctive ABILIFY, except adverse reactions which had an incidence equal to or less than placebo.
* Antidepressant Therapy

Patients With Agitation Associated With Schizophrenia Or Bipolar Mania (Intramuscular Injection)

The following findings are based on a pool of three placebo-controlled trials of patients with agitation associated with schizophrenia or bipolar mania in which ABILIFY injection was administered at doses of 5.25 mg to 15 mg.

Commonly Observed Adverse Reactions

There was one commonly observed adverse reaction (nausea) associated with the use of ABILIFY injection in patients with agitation associated with schizophrenia and bipolar mania (incidence of 5% or greater and ABILIFY incidence at least twice that for placebo).

Less Common Adverse Reactions in Patients with Agitation Associated with Schizophrenia or Bipolar Mania

Table 24 enumerates the pooled incidence, rounded to the nearest percent, of adverse reactions that occurred during acute therapy (24-hour), including only those adverse reactions that occurred in 2% or more of patients treated with ABILIFY injection (doses ≥ 5.25 mg/day) and for which the incidence in patients treated with ABILIFY injection was greater than the incidence in patients treated with placebo in the combined dataset.

Table 24: Adverse Reactions in Short-Term, Placebo-Controlled Trials in Patients Treated with ABILIFY Injection

System Organ Class
Preferred Term
Percentage of Patients Reporting Reactiona
ABILIFY
(n=501)
Placebo
(n=220)
Cardiac Disorders
  Tachycardia 2 < 1
Gastrointestinal Disorders
  Nausea 9 3
  Vomiting 3 1
General Disorders and Administration Site Conditions
  Fatigue 2 1
Nervous System Disorders
  Headache 12 7
  Dizziness 8 5
  Somnolence 7 4
  Sedation 3 2
  Akathisia 2 0
a Adverse reactions reported by at least 2% of patients treated with ABILIFY injection, except adverse reactions which had an incidence equal to or less than placebo.

Dose-Related Adverse Reactions

Schizophrenia

Dose response relationships for the incidence of treatment-emergent adverse events were evaluated from four trials in adult patients with schizophrenia comparing various fixed doses (2, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 30 mg/day) of oral ABILIFY to placebo. This analysis, stratified by study, indicated that the only adverse reaction to have a possible dose response relationship, and then most prominent only with 30 mg, was somnolence [including sedation]; (incidences were placebo, 7.1%; 10 mg, 8.5%; 15 mg, 8.7%; 20 mg, 7.5%; 30 mg, 12.6%).

In the study of pediatric patients (13 to 17 years of age) with schizophrenia, three common adverse reactions appeared to have a possible dose response relationship: extrapyramidal disorder (incidences were placebo, 5.0%; 10 mg, 13.0%; 30 mg, 21.6%); somnolence (incidences were placebo, 6.0%; 10 mg, 11.0%; 30 mg, 21.6%); and tremor (incidences were placebo, 2.0%; 10 mg, 2.0%; 30 mg, 11.8%).

Bipolar Mania

In the study of pediatric patients (10 to 17 years of age) with bipolar mania, four common adverse reactions had a possible dose response relationship at 4 weeks; extrapyramidal disorder (incidences were placebo, 3.1%; 10 mg, 12.2%; 30 mg, 27.3%); somnolence (incidences were placebo, 3.1%; 10 mg, 19.4%; 30 mg, 26.3%); akathisia (incidences were placebo, 2.1%; 10 mg, 8.2%; 30 mg, 11.1%); and salivary hypersecretion (incidences were placebo, 0%; 10 mg, 3.1%; 30 mg, 8.1%).

Autistic Disorder

In a study of pediatric patients (6 to 17 years of age) with autistic disorder, one common adverse reaction had a possible dose response relationship: fatigue (incidences were placebo, 0%; 5 mg, 3.8%; 10 mg, 22.0%; 15 mg, 18.5%).

Tourette's Disorder

In a study of pediatric patients (7 to 17 years of age) with Tourette's disorder, no common adverse reaction(s) had a dose response relationship.

Extrapyramidal Symptoms

Schizophrenia

In short-term, placebo-controlled trials in schizophrenia in adults, the incidence of reported EPS-related events, excluding events related to akathisia, for ABILIFY-treated patients was 13% vs. 12% for placebo; and the incidence of akathisia-related events for ABILIFY-treated patients was 8% vs. 4% for placebo. In the short-term, placebo-controlled trial of schizophrenia in pediatric patients (13 to 17 years), the incidence of reported EPS-related events, excluding events related to akathisia, for ABILIFY-treated patients was 25% vs. 7% for placebo; and the incidence of akathisia-related events for ABILIFY-treated patients was 9% vs. 6% for placebo.

Objectively collected data from those trials was collected on the Simpson Angus Rating Scale (for EPS), the Barnes Akathisia Scale (for akathisia), and the Assessments of Involuntary Movement Scales (for dyskinesias). In the adult schizophrenia trials, the objectively collected data did not show a difference between ABILIFY and placebo, with the exception of the Barnes Akathisia Scale (ABILIFY, 0.08; placebo, -0.05). In the pediatric (13 to 17 years) schizophrenia trial, the objectively collected data did not show a difference between ABILIFY and placebo, with the exception of the Simpson Angus Rating Scale (ABILIFY, 0.24; placebo, -0.29).

Similarly, in a long-term (26-week), placebo-controlled trial of schizophrenia in adults, objectively collected data on the Simpson Angus Rating Scale (for EPS), the Barnes Akathisia Scale (for akathisia), and the Assessments of Involuntary Movement Scales (for dyskinesias) did not show a difference between ABILIFY and placebo.

Bipolar Mania

In the short-term, placebo-controlled trials in bipolar mania in adults, the incidence of reported EPS-related events, excluding events related to akathisia, for monotherapy ABILIFY-treated patients was 16% vs. 8% for placebo and the incidence of akathisia-related events for monotherapy ABILIFY-treated patients was 13% vs. 4% for placebo. In the 6-week, placebo-controlled trial in bipolar mania for adjunctive therapy with lithium or valproate, the incidence of reported EPS-related events, excluding events related to akathisia for adjunctive ABILIFY-treated patients was 15% vs. 8% for adjunctive placebo and the incidence of akathisia-related events for adjunctive ABILIFY-treated patients was 19% vs. 5% for adjunctive placebo. In the short-term, placebo-controlled trial in bipolar mania in pediatric (10 to 17 years) patients, the incidence of reported EPS-related events, excluding events related to akathisia, for ABILIFY-treated patients was 26% vs. 5% for placebo and the incidence of akathisia-related events for ABILIFY-treated patients was 10% vs. 2% for placebo.

In the adult bipolar mania trials with monotherapy ABILIFY, the Simpson Angus Rating Scale and the Barnes Akathisia Scale showed a significant difference between ABILIFY and placebo (ABILIFY, 0.50; placebo, -0.01 and ABILIFY, 0.21; placebo, -0.05). Changes in the Assessments of Involuntary Movement Scales were similar for the ABILIFY and placebo groups. In the bipolar mania trials with ABILIFY as adjunctive therapy with either lithium or valproate, the Simpson Angus Rating Scale and the Barnes Akathisia Scale showed a significant difference between adjunctive ABILIFY and adjunctive placebo (ABILIFY, 0.73; placebo, 0.07 and ABILIFY, 0.30; placebo, 0.11). Changes in the Assessments of Involuntary Movement Scales were similar for adjunctive ABILIFY and adjunctive placebo. In the pediatric (10 to 17 years), short-term, bipolar mania trial, the Simpson Angus Rating Scale showed a significant difference between ABILIFY and placebo (ABILIFY, 0.90; placebo, -0.05). Changes in the Barnes Akathisia Scale and the Assessments of Involuntary Movement Scales were similar for the ABILIFY and placebo groups.

Major Depressive Disorder

In the short-term, placebo-controlled trials in major depressive disorder, the incidence of reported EPS-related events, excluding events related to akathisia, for adjunctive ABILIFY-treated patients was 8% vs. 5% for adjunctive placebo-treated patients; and the incidence of akathisia-related events for adjunctive ABILIFY-treated patients was 25% vs. 4% for adjunctive placebo-treated patients.

In the major depressive disorder trials, the Simpson Angus Rating Scale and the Barnes Akathisia Scale showed a significant difference between adjunctive ABILIFY and adjunctive placebo (ABILIFY, 0.31; placebo, 0.03 and ABILIFY, 0.22; placebo, 0.02). Changes in the Assessments of Involuntary Movement Scales were similar for the adjunctive ABILIFY and adjunctive placebo groups.

Autistic Disorder

In the short-term, placebo-controlled trials in autistic disorder in pediatric patients (6 to 17 years), the incidence of reported EPS-related events, excluding events related to akathisia, for ABILIFY-treated patients was 18% vs. 2% for placebo and the incidence of akathisia-related events for ABILIFY-treated patients was 3% vs. 9% for placebo.

In the pediatric (6 to 17 years) short-term autistic disorder trials, the Simpson Angus Rating Scale showed a significant difference between ABILIFY and placebo (ABILIFY, 0.1; placebo, 0.4). Changes in the Barnes Akathisia Scale and the Assessments of Involuntary Movement Scales were similar for the ABILIFY and placebo groups.

Tourette's Disorder

In the short-term, placebo-controlled trials in Tourette's disorder in pediatric patients (6 to 18 years), the incidence of reported EPS-related events, excluding events related to akathisia, for ABILIFY-treated patients was 7% vs. 6% for placebo and the incidence of akathisia-related events for ABILIFY-treated patients was 4% vs. 6% for placebo.

In the pediatric (6 to 18 years) short-term Tourette's disorder trials, changes in the Simpson Angus Rating Scale, Barnes Akathisia Scale and Assessments of Involuntary Movement Scale were not clinically meaningfully different for ABILIFY and placebo.

Agitation Associated with Schizophrenia or Bipolar Mania

In the placebo-controlled trials in patients with agitation associated with schizophrenia or bipolar mania, the incidence of reported EPS-related events excluding events related to akathisia for ABILIFY-treated patients was 2% vs. 2% for placebo and the incidence of akathisia-related events for ABILIFY-treated patients was 2% vs. 0% for placebo. Objectively collected data on the Simpson Angus Rating Scale (for EPS) and the Barnes Akathisia Scale (for akathisia) for all treatment groups did not show a difference between ABILIFY and placebo.

Dystonia

Symptoms of dystonia, prolonged abnormal contractions of muscle groups, may occur in susceptible individuals during the first few days of treatment. Dystonic symptoms include: spasm of the neck muscles, sometimes progressing to tightness of the throat, swallowing difficulty, difficulty breathing, and/or protrusion of the tongue. While these symptoms can occur at low doses, they occur more frequently and with greater severity with high potency and at higher doses of first generation antipsychotic drugs. An elevated risk of acute dystonia is observed in males and younger age groups.

Additional Findings Observed In Clinical Trials

Adverse Reactions in Long-Term, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trials

The adverse reactions reported in a 26-week, double-blind trial comparing oral ABILIFY and placebo in patients with schizophrenia were generally consistent with those reported in the short-term, placebo-controlled trials, except for a higher incidence of tremor [8% (12/153) for ABILIFY vs. 2% (3/153) for placebo]. In this study, the majority of the cases of tremor were of mild intensity (8/12 mild and 4/12 moderate), occurred early in therapy (9/12 ≤ 49 days), and were of limited duration (7/12 ≤ 10 days). Tremor infrequently led to discontinuation ( < 1%) of ABILIFY. In addition, in a long-term (52 week), active-controlled study, the incidence of tremor was 5% (40/859) for ABILIFY. A similar profile was observed in a long-term monotherapy study and a long-term adjunctive study with lithium and valproate in bipolar disorder.

Other Adverse Reactions Observed During the Premarketing Evaluation Of ABILIFY

The following listing does not include reactions: 1) already listed in previous tables or elsewhere in labeling, 2) for which a drug cause was remote, 3) which were so general as to be uninformative, 4) which were not considered to have significant clinical implications, or 5) which occurred at a rate equal to or less than placebo.

Reactions are categorized by body system according to the following definitions: frequent adverse reactions are those occurring in at least 1/100 patients; infrequent adverse reactions are those occurring in 1/100 to 1/1000 patients; rare reactions are those occurring in fewer than 1/1000 patients:

Adults -Oral Administration

Blood and Lymphatic System Disorders: rare -thrombocytopenia

Cardiac Disorders: infrequent - bradycardia, palpitations, rare - atrial flutter, cardiorespiratory arrest, atrioventricular block, atrial fibrillation, angina pectoris, myocardial ischemia, myocardial infarction, cardiopulmonary failure

Eye Disorders: infrequent - photophobia; rare -diplopia

Gastrointestinal Disorders: infrequent -gastroesophageal reflux disease

General Disorders and Administration Site Conditions: frequent -asthenia; infrequent - peripheral edema, chest pain; rare - face edema

Hepatobiliary Disorders: rare -hepatitis, jaundice

Immune System Disorders: rare -hypersensitivity

Injury, Poisoning, and Procedural Complications: infrequent fall; rare heat stroke

Investigations: frequent -weight decreased, infrequent -hepatic enzyme increased, blood glucose increased, blood lactate dehydrogenase increased, gamma glutamyl transferase increased; rare - blood prolactin increased, blood urea increased, blood creatinine increased, blood bilirubin increased, electrocardiogram QT prolonged, glycosylated hemoglobin increased

Metabolism and Nutrition Disorders: frequent - anorexia; infrequent -rare - hypokalemia, hyponatremia, hypoglycemia

Musculoskeletal and Connective Tissue Disorders: infrequent -muscular weakness, muscle tightness; rare - rhabdomyolysis, mobility decreased

Nervous System Disorders: infrequent -parkinsonism, memory impairment, cogwheel rigidity, hypokinesia, myoclonus, bradykinesia; rare akinesia, myoclonus, coordination abnormal, speech disorder, Grand Mal convulsion; < 1/10,000 patients -choreoathetosis

Psychiatric Disorders: infrequent - aggression, loss of libido, delirium; rare - libido increased, anorgasmia, tic, homicidal ideation, catatonia, sleep walking

Renal and Urinary Disorders: rare -urinary retention, nocturia

Reproductive System and Breast Disorders: infrequent -erectile dysfunction; rare - gynaecomastia, menstruation irregular, amenorrhea, breast pain, priapism

Respiratory, Thoracic, and Mediastinal Disorders: infrequent -nasal congestion, dyspnea

Skin and Subcutaneous Tissue Disorders: infrequent -rash, hyperhidrosis, pruritus, photosensitivity reaction, alopecia; rare -urticaria

Vascular Disorders: infrequent hypotension, hypertension

Pediatric Patients -Oral Administration

Most adverse events observed in the pooled database of 1,686 pediatric patients, aged 6 to 18 years, were also observed in the adult population. Additional adverse reactions observed in the pediatric population are listed below.

Eye Disorders :infrequent -oculogyric crisis

Gastrointestinal Disorders: infrequent -tongue dry, tongue spasm

Investigations: frequent -blood insulin increased

Nervous System Disorders: infrequent -sleep talking

Renal and Urinary Disorders frequent - enuresis

Skin and Subcutaneous Tissue Disorders: infrequent -hirsutism

Adults -Intramuscular Injection

Most adverse reactions observed in the pooled database of 749 adult patients treated with ABILIFY injection, were also observed in the adult population treated with oral ABILIFY. Additional adverse reactions observed in the ABILIFY injection population are listed below.

General Disorders and Administration Site Conditions: ≥ 1/100 patients -injection site reaction; ≥ 1/1000 patients and < 1/100 patients -venipuncture site bruise

Postmarketing Experience

The following adverse reactions have been identified during post-approval use of ABILIFY. Because these reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to establish a causal relationship to drug exposure: occurrences of allergic reaction (anaphylactic reaction, angioedema, laryngospasm, pruritus/urticaria, or oropharyngeal spasm), pathological gambling, hiccups and blood glucose fluctuation.

Read the entire FDA prescribing information for Abilify (Aripiprazole)

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How should I take Abilify?

Take Abilify exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Follow all directions on your prescription label. Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results. Do not take this medicine in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

Do not take Abilify for longer than 6 weeks unless your doctor has told you to.

Abilify can be taken with or without food.

Measure liquid medicine with the dosing syringe provided, or with a special dose-measuring spoon or medicine cup. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.

To take the orally disintegrating tablet (Discmelt):

  • Keep the tablet in its blister pack until you are ready to take it. Open the package and peel back the foil. Do not push a tablet through the foil or you may damage the tablet.

  • Use dry hands to remove the tablet and place it in your mouth.

  • Do not swallow the tablet whole. Allow it to dissolve in your mouth without chewing. If desired, you may drink liquid to help swallow the dissolved tablet.

Use Abilify regularly to get the most benefit. Get your prescription refilled before you run out of medicine completely.

You should not stop using Abilify suddenly. Stopping suddenly may make your condition worse.

Your doctor will need to check your progress while you are using this medicine.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Abilify liquid may be used for up to 6 months after opening, but not after the expiration date on the medicine label.

What should I avoid while taking Abilify?

This medication may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert. Avoid getting up too fast from a sitting or lying position, or you may feel dizzy. Dizziness or severe drowsiness can cause falls, fractures, or other injuries.

Avoid drinking alcohol. Dangerous side effects could occur.

Avoid becoming overheated or dehydrated. Drink plenty of fluids, especially in hot weather and during exercise. It is easier to become dangerously overheated and dehydrated while you are taking Abilify.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Overdose symptoms may include drowsiness, vomiting, aggression, confusion, tremors, fast or slow heart rate, seizure (convulsions), trouble breathing, or fainting.

What should I avoid while taking aripiprazole?

This medication may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert. Avoid getting up too fast from a sitting or lying position, or you may feel dizzy. Dizziness or severe drowsiness can cause falls, fractures, or other injuries.

Avoid drinking alcohol. Dangerous side effects could occur.

Avoid becoming overheated or dehydrated. Drink plenty of fluids, especially in hot weather and during exercise. It is easier to become dangerously overheated and dehydrated while you are taking aripiprazole.

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