Acetaminophen and oxycodone

Name: Acetaminophen and oxycodone

What other drugs will affect acetaminophen and oxycodone?

Narcotic (opioid) medication can interact with many other drugs and cause dangerous side effects or death. Be sure your doctor knows if you also use:

  • other narcotic medications--opioid pain medicine or prescription cough medicine;

  • drugs that make you sleepy or slow your breathing--a sleeping pill, muscle relaxer, sedative, tranquilizer, or antipsychotic medicine; or

  • drugs that affect serotonin levels in your body--medicine for depression, Parkinson's disease, migraine headaches, serious infections, or prevention of nausea and vomiting.

This list is not complete. Other drugs may interact with acetaminophen and oxycodone, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Not all possible interactions are listed in this medication guide.

Downsides

If you are between the ages of 18 and 60, take no other medication or have no other medical conditions, side effects you are more likely to experience include:

  • Drowsiness or dizziness which may impair reaction skills and affect a person's ability to drive or operate machinery (oxycodone component). Avoid alcohol.
  • Stomach upset including nausea and vomiting, and constipation (oxycodone component). Laxatives may be required.
  • Excessive dosages of acetaminophen can lead to liver injury or death. Care must be taken not to take additional acetaminophen from other sources.
  • Unlike NSAID pain relievers like ibuprofen, acetaminophen does not have any appreciable anti-inflammatory action.
  • Oxycodone is habit forming and potentially abusable. The combination of acetaminophen and oxycodone should only be used short-term at the lowest effective dose when other nonopioid analgesics are not effective. Legitimate supplies of products containing oxycodone may be sought out by drug seekers.
  • Abrupt discontinuation of any oxycodone-containing medication in a person who has become physically dependent on it may lead to a withdrawal syndrome and symptoms such as restlessness, pupil dilation, watery eyes and a runny nose, sweating, muscle aches, insomnia, irritability and gastrointestinal complaints. Babies born to mothers who are physically dependent on oxycodone will also be physically dependent.
  • Rarely, serious, life-threatening, breathing problems may occur attributable to the oxycodone component. The risk is greater with higher dosages of acetaminophen/oxycodone, in people with pre-existing respiratory disease, in seniors or the frail, or in those taking other medications that cause respiratory depression (such as benzodiazepines).
  • Interaction or overdosage may also cause serotonin syndrome. Symptoms include mental status changes such as agitation, hallucinations, coma, or delirium; a fast heart rate; dizziness; flushing; muscle tremor or rigidity; and stomach symptoms (including nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea).
  • May not be suitable for people with pre-existing respiratory depression or respiratory disease, with seizure disorders or a head injury, people with gastrointestinal obstruction, or recent use of monoamine oxidase inhibitors.
  • Not suitable for people younger than 18 years.

Notes: In general, seniors or children, people with certain medical conditions (such as liver or kidney problems, heart disease, diabetes, seizures) or people who take other medications are more at risk of developing a wider range of side effects. For a complete list of all side effects, click here.

Acetaminophen / oxycodone Pregnancy Warnings

Prolonged use of opioids during pregnancy can result in physical dependence in the neonate and neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome shortly after birth. The onset, duration, and severity of the condition will vary based on use (duration of use, timing, and amount of last maternal use) and rate of elimination in the newborn. There are no controlled data in human pregnancy. Chronic use of opioids may cause reduced fertility; it is unknown whether these effects are reversible. US FDA pregnancy category C: Animal reproduction studies have shown an adverse effect on the fetus and there are no adequate and well-controlled studies in humans, but potential benefits may warrant use of the drug in pregnant women despite potential risks. US FDA pregnancy category Not Assigned: The US FDA has amended the pregnancy labeling rule for prescription drug products to require labeling that includes a summary of risk, a discussion of the data supporting that summary, and relevant information to help health care providers make prescribing decisions and counsel women about the use of drugs during pregnancy. Pregnancy categories A, B, C, D, and X are being phased out.

Not recommended US FDA pregnancy category: C (immediate-release); Not Assigned (extended-release) Comments: -Prolonged use of opioids during pregnancy can result in physical dependence in the neonate; women should be advised of the risk of neonatal abstinence syndrome and ensure that appropriate treatment will be available. -Monitor neonates exposed to opioid analgesics for signs of excess sedation and respiratory depression.

(web3)