Adderall

Name: Adderall

Adderall Interactions

It's very important to let your doctor know about all drugs you are taking, including illegal drugs, any over-the-counter (OTC) drugs, and any herbs or supplements.

If you have taken an antidepressant called a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) in the last two weeks, you should not take Adderall. MAOIs include:

  • Isocarboxazid (Marplan)
  • Phenelzine (Nardil)
  • Selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam, Zelapar)
  • Tranylcypromine (Parnate)

Types of drugs that are known to interact with Adderall and may cause problems include:

  • Blood pressure medications, such as adrenergic blocker or alpha blockers like alfuzosin (Uroxatral), doxazosin (Cardura), and prazosin (Minipress)
  • Seizure medications, such as ethosuximide (Zarontin), phenobarbital (Luminal, Solfoton), and phenytoin (Dilantin)
  • Blood thinners, such as warfarin (Coumadin)
  • Over-the-counter cough and cold medicines and antihistamines that contain decongestants
  • Heart medications, such as beta blockers like atenolol (Tenormin), labetalol (Normodyne), and metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol XL)
  • Diuretics (water pills), such as furosemide (Lasix)
  • Medications used to treat schizophrenia or bipolar disorder, such as haloperidol (Haldol)
  • Prescription pain medications, including meperidine (Demerol) and propoxyphene (Darvon)
  • Diet supplements called glutamic acid or L-glutamine

Additionally, Adderall may affect your level of concentration, coordination, and judgment.

Because of this, do not drive or participate in activities that could be dangerous until you know how Adderall will affect you.

Canadian Brand Name

  1. Adderall XR - 10mg
  2. Adderall XR - 15mg
  3. Adderall XR - 20mg
  4. Adderall XR - 25mg
  5. Adderall XR - 30mg
  6. Adderall XR - 5mg

What are the side effects of amphetamine and dextroamphetamine?

Side effects of amphetamines include excessive stimulation of the nervous system leading to:

  • nervousness,
  • restlessness,
  • excitability,
  • dizziness,
  • headache,
  • insomnia,
  • fear,
  • anxiety,
  • tremor,
  • hallucinations, and
  • convulsions (seizures).

Blood pressure and heart rate may increase, and patients may experience palpitations of the heart.

Other important side effects include:

  • Sudden death,
  • stroke,
  • heart attack,
  • depression,
  • manic episodes,
  • aggressive behavior or hostility,
  • psychosis,
  • growth suppression (long-term use),
  • dependence, and
  • withdrawal symptoms

Priapism defined as painful and nonpainful penile erection lasting more than 4 hours, have been reported in pediatric and adult patients treated with stimulants. The erection usually resolves when the drug is stopped. Prompt medical attention is required in the event of suspected priapism.

Uses For Adderall

Amphetamine and dextroamphetamine combination is used to treat attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and narcolepsy (uncontrollable desire for sleep or sudden attacks of deep sleep). These two medicines belong to the group of medicines called central nervous system (CNS) stimulants.

Amphetamine and dextroamphetamine combination works in the treatment of ADHD to increase attention and decrease restlessness in patients who are overactive, cannot concentrate, or are easily distracted. It is used as part of a total treatment program that also includes social, educational, and psychological therapy.

This medicine is available only with a doctor's prescription. Prescriptions cannot be refilled. A new prescription must be obtained from your doctor each time you need this medicine.

Before Using Adderall

In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For this medicine, the following should be considered:

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to this medicine or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated pediatric-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of amphetamine and dextroamphetamine combination to treat ADHD in children. However, safety and efficacy have not been established in children younger than 3 years of age for Adderall® tablets, in children younger than 6 years of age for Adderall XR® extended-release capsules, and in children younger than 13 years of age for Mydayis™ extended-release capsules.

Geriatric

Appropriate studies on the relationship of age to the effects of Adderall® tablets and Adderall XR® extended-release capsules have not been performed in the geriatric population.

Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated geriatric-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of Mydayis™ extended-release capsules in the elderly. However, elderly patients are more likely to have age-related liver, kidney, or heart problems, which may require caution and an adjustment in the dose for patients receiving this medicine.

Pregnancy

Pregnancy Category Explanation
All Trimesters C Animal studies have shown an adverse effect and there are no adequate studies in pregnant women OR no animal studies have been conducted and there are no adequate studies in pregnant women.

Breast Feeding

Studies in women breastfeeding have demonstrated harmful infant effects. An alternative to this medication should be prescribed or you should stop breastfeeding while using this medicine.

Interactions with Medicines

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are taking this medicine, it is especially important that your healthcare professional know if you are taking any of the medicines listed below. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is not recommended. Your doctor may decide not to treat you with this medication or change some of the other medicines you take.

  • Furazolidone
  • Iproniazid
  • Isocarboxazid
  • Linezolid
  • Methylene Blue
  • Moclobemide
  • Nialamide
  • Phenelzine
  • Procarbazine
  • Rasagiline
  • Safinamide
  • Selegiline
  • Sibutramine
  • Tranylcypromine

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is usually not recommended, but may be required in some cases. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

  • Abiraterone
  • Acetazolamide
  • Alfentanil
  • Almotriptan
  • Amineptine
  • Amitriptyline
  • Amitriptylinoxide
  • Amoxapine
  • Benzthiazide
  • Brompheniramine
  • Buprenorphine
  • Bupropion
  • Buspirone
  • Butorphanol
  • Carbamazepine
  • Chlorothiazide
  • Chlorpheniramine
  • Cinacalcet
  • Citalopram
  • Clomipramine
  • Cocaine
  • Codeine
  • Cyclobenzaprine
  • Desipramine
  • Desvenlafaxine
  • Dextromethorphan
  • Diazoxide
  • Dibenzepin
  • Difenoxin
  • Dihydrocodeine
  • Diphenoxylate
  • Dolasetron
  • Donepezil
  • Doxepin
  • Duloxetine
  • Eletriptan
  • Escitalopram
  • Ethylmorphine
  • Fentanyl
  • Fluoxetine
  • Fluvoxamine
  • Frovatriptan
  • Granisetron
  • Hydrochlorothiazide
  • Hydrocodone
  • Hydroflumethiazide
  • Hydromorphone
  • Hydroxytryptophan
  • Imipramine
  • Ketobemidone
  • Levomilnacipran
  • Levorphanol
  • Lithium
  • Lofepramine
  • Lorcaserin
  • Melitracen
  • Meperidine
  • Methadone
  • Milnacipran
  • Mirabegron
  • Mirtazapine
  • Morphine
  • Morphine Sulfate Liposome
  • Nalbuphine
  • Naratriptan
  • Nefazodone
  • Nicomorphine
  • Nortriptyline
  • Ondansetron
  • Opipramol
  • Opium
  • Opium Alkaloids
  • Oxycodone
  • Oxymorphone
  • Palonosetron
  • Papaveretum
  • Paregoric
  • Paroxetine
  • Pentazocine
  • Piritramide
  • Polythiazide
  • Protriptyline
  • Quinidine
  • Quinine
  • Remifentanil
  • Rizatriptan
  • Rolapitant
  • Sertraline
  • Sodium Bicarbonate
  • St John's Wort
  • Sufentanil
  • Sumatriptan
  • Tapentadol
  • Terbinafine
  • Tianeptine
  • Tilidine
  • Tramadol
  • Trazodone
  • Trichlormethiazide
  • Trimipramine
  • Tryptophan
  • Venlafaxine
  • Vilazodone
  • Vortioxetine
  • Xipamide
  • Ziprasidone
  • Zolmitriptan

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines may cause an increased risk of certain side effects, but using both drugs may be the best treatment for you. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

  • Guanethidine

Interactions with Food/Tobacco/Alcohol

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Other Medical Problems

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of this medicine. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

  • Agitation, severe or
  • Anxiety, severe or
  • Arteriosclerosis (hardening of the arteries), severe or
  • Coronary artery disease or
  • Drug abuse, history of or
  • Glaucoma or
  • Heart attack, recent or
  • Heart or blood vessel disease (eg, cardiomyopathy), severe or
  • Heart rhythm problems (eg, ventricular arrhythmia) or
  • Hypertension (high blood pressure), moderate to severe or
  • Hyperthyroidism (overactive thyroid) or
  • Stroke, history of or
  • Tension, severe—Should not be used in patients with these conditions.
  • Bipolar disorder (manic-depressive illness), or a family history of or
  • Depression, or a family history of or
  • Heart rhythm problems (eg, arrhythmia), or a family history of or
  • Hypertension (high blood pressure), mild or
  • Mania, history of or
  • Psychosis (mental illness), history of or
  • Raynaud disease or
  • Seizures, history of or
  • Tachycardia (fast heart rate) or
  • Tourette syndrome (tics), or a family history of—Use with caution. May make these conditions worse.

How is this medicine (Adderall) best taken?

Use this medicine as ordered by your doctor. Read all information given to you. Follow all instructions closely.

  • Take with or without food.
  • Take last dose of the day at least 4 hours before bedtime.
  • To gain the most benefit, do not miss doses.
  • Keep taking Adderall as you have been told by your doctor or other health care provider, even if you feel well.
  • Talk with your doctor before using OTC products that may raise blood pressure. These include cough or cold drugs, diet pills, stimulants, ibuprofen or like products, and some natural products or aids.

What do I do if I miss a dose?

  • Take a missed dose as soon as you think about it.
  • If it is close to the time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your normal time.
  • Do not take 2 doses at the same time or extra doses.

What are some side effects that I need to call my doctor about right away?

WARNING/CAUTION: Even though it may be rare, some people may have very bad and sometimes deadly side effects when taking a drug. Tell your doctor or get medical help right away if you have any of the following signs or symptoms that may be related to a very bad side effect:

  • Signs of an allergic reaction, like rash; hives; itching; red, swollen, blistered, or peeling skin with or without fever; wheezing; tightness in the chest or throat; trouble breathing or talking; unusual hoarseness; or swelling of the mouth, face, lips, tongue, or throat.
  • Signs of high blood pressure like very bad headache or dizziness, passing out, or change in eyesight.
  • A fast heartbeat.
  • Very nervous and excitable.
  • Change in sex ability.
  • Lowered interest in sex.
  • A heartbeat that does not feel normal.
  • Seizures.
  • Trouble controlling body movements.
  • Restlessness.
  • Change in eyesight.
  • For males, erections (hard penis) that happen often or that last a long time.
  • Change in color of hands or feet from pale to blue or red.
  • Numbness, pain, tingling, or cold feeling of the hands or feet.
  • Any sores or wounds on the fingers or toes.
  • Dark urine.
  • Not able to pass urine or change in how much urine is passed.
  • Muscle pain or weakness.
  • Heart attacks, strokes, and sudden deaths have happened in adults taking this medicine. Sudden deaths have also happened in children with very bad heart problems or heart defects. Call your doctor right away if you have a change in strength on 1 side that is greater than the other, trouble speaking or thinking, change in balance, drooping on 1 side of the face, change in eyesight, chest pain or pressure, shortness of breath, or very bad dizziness or passing out.

If OVERDOSE is suspected

If you think there has been an overdose, call your poison control center or get medical care right away. Be ready to tell or show what was taken, how much, and when it happened.

Drug Interactions

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are taking this medicine, it is especially important that your healthcare professional know if you are taking any of the medicines listed below. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is not recommended. Your doctor may decide not to treat you with this medication or change some of the other medicines you take.

  • Clorgyline
  • Furazolidone
  • Iproniazid
  • Isocarboxazid
  • Linezolid
  • Methylene Blue
  • Moclobemide
  • Nialamide
  • Pargyline
  • Phenelzine
  • Procarbazine
  • Rasagiline
  • Safinamide
  • Selegiline
  • Sibutramine
  • Toloxatone
  • Tranylcypromine

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is usually not recommended, but may be required in some cases. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

  • Acetazolamide
  • Benzthiazide
  • Chlorothiazide
  • Chlorpromazine
  • Diazoxide
  • Donepezil
  • Furazolidone
  • Hydrochlorothiazide
  • Hydroflumethiazide
  • Hydroxytryptophan
  • Polythiazide
  • Safinamide
  • Sodium Bicarbonate
  • Trichlormethiazide
  • Xipamide

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines may cause an increased risk of certain side effects, but using both drugs may be the best treatment for you. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

  • Guanethidine

How should I take Adderall?

Take Adderall exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Follow all directions on your prescription label. Your doctor may occasionally change your dose. Do not take this medicine in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

Adderall may be habit-forming. Never share this medicine with another person, especially someone with a history of drug abuse or addiction. Keep the medication in a place where others cannot get to it. Selling or giving away this medicine is against the law.

Read all patient information, medication guides, and instruction sheets provided to you. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions.

You may take Adderall with or without food, first thing in the morning.

Do not crush, chew, break, or open an extended-release capsule. Swallow it whole.

To make swallowing easier, you may open the capsule and sprinkle the medicine into a spoonful of applesauce. Swallow right away without chewing. Do not save the mixture for later use.

While using this medicine, your doctor will need to check your progress at regular visits. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using this medicine.

Adderall can cause unusual results with certain medical tests. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using this medicine.

Store at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light.

Keep track of your medicine. Adderall is a drug of abuse and you should be aware if anyone is using your medicine improperly or without a prescription.

Adderall dosing information

Usual Adult Dose of Adderall for Attention Deficit Disorder:

IR:
-Initial Dose: 5 mg orally 1 or 2 times a day
-Maintenance Dose: Daily dose may be raised in 5 mg increments at weekly intervals until optimal response is obtained.
-Maximum Dose: Only in rare cases will it be necessary to exceed 40 mg per day.

XR:
Patients starting treatment for the first time or switching from another medication:
-Initial Dose: 20 mg orally once a day

Comments:
-IR: The first dose should be given upon awakening; 1 to 2 additional doses should be given at intervals of 4 to 6 hours.
-Where possible, drug administration should be interrupted occasionally to determine if continued therapy is required.

Use: As part of a total treatment program for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD).

Usual Adult Dose of Adderall for Narcolepsy:

IR:
-Initial Dose: 10 mg orally per day in divided doses
-Maintenance Dose: Daily dose may be raised in 10 mg increments at weekly intervals until optimal response is obtained.

Comments:
-The first dose should be given on awakening; 1 to 2 additional doses should be given at intervals of 4 to 6 hours.
-The usual dose is 5 to 60 mg per day in divided doses, depending on the individual patient response.
-Dosage should be reduced if bothersome adverse reactions (e.g., insomnia, anorexia) appear.

Use: Narcolepsy treatment

Usual Pediatric Dose of Adderall for Attention Deficit Disorder:

IR:
Age 3 to 5 Years:
-Initial Dose: 2.5 mg orally per day
-Maintenance Dose: Daily dose may be raised in 2.5 mg increments at weekly intervals until optimal response is obtained.

Age 6 to 17 Years:
-Initial Dose: 5 mg orally 1 or 2 times a day
-Maintenance Dose: Daily dose may be raised in 5 mg increments at weekly intervals until optimal response is obtained.
-Maximum Dose: Only in rare cases will it be necessary to exceed 40 mg per day.

XR:
Age 6 to 12 Years (starting treatment for the first time or switching from another medication):
-Initial Dose: 5 or 10 mg orally once a day in the morning
-Maintenance Dose: Daily dose may be raised in 5 to 10 mg increments at weekly intervals.
-Maximum Dose: 30 mg/day

Age 13 to 17 Years (starting treatment for the first time or switching from another medication):
-Initial Dose: 10 mg orally once a day
-Maintenance Dose: Daily dose may be increased to 20 mg/day after one week if symptoms are not adequately controlled.
-Maximum Dose: 30 mg/day

Comments:
-IR: The first dose should be given on awakening; 1 to 2 additional doses should be given at intervals of 4 to 6 hours.
-Where possible, drug administration should be interrupted occasionally to determine if continued therapy is required.

Use: As part of a total treatment program for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD).

Usual Pediatric Dose of Adderall for Narcolepsy:

IR:
Age 6 to 11 Years:
-Initial Dose: 5 mg orally per day in divided doses
-Maintenance Dose: Daily dose may be raised in 5 mg increments at weekly intervals until optimal response is obtained.

Age 12 Years and Older:
-Initial Dose: 10 mg orally per day in divided doses
-Maintenance Dose: Daily dose may be raised in 10 mg increments at weekly intervals until optimal response is obtained.

Comments:
-The first dose should be given on awakening; 1 to 2 additional doses should be given at intervals of 4 to 6 hours.
-The usual dose is 5 to 60 mg per day in divided doses, depending on the individual patient response.
-Dosage should be reduced if bothersome adverse reactions (e.g., insomnia, anorexia) appear.
-Narcolepsy rarely occurs in children under 12 years of age.

Use: Narcolepsy treatment

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember, but not late in the day. Skip the missed dose if it is almost evening. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

Upsides

  • Used in the treatment of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) to increase attention and decrease hyperactivity and impulsiveness.
  • May be given to increase alertness in people with the sleep disorder, narcolepsy.
  • When given for ADHD, Adderall should be used in conjunction with other treatment options, such as psychotherapy, education about the disorder, and social integration advice.
  • FDA approved for children over the age of three.
  • Adderall is available as a generic under the name mixed amphetamine salts (which may be abbreviated to MAS or M. amphet salts).

What is amphetamine and dextroamphetamine?

Amphetamine and dextroamphetamine are central nervous system stimulants that affect chemicals in the brain and nerves that contribute to hyperactivity and impulse control.

Amphetamine and dextroamphetamine is a combination medicine used to treat narcolepsy and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

Amphetamine and dextroamphetamine may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What other drugs will affect amphetamine and dextroamphetamine?

Ask your doctor before using a stomach acid medicine (including Alka-Seltzer or sodium bicarbonate). Some of these medicines can change the way your body absorbs amphetamine and dextroamphetamine, and may increase side effects.

Tell your doctor about all your current medicines and any you start or stop using, especially:

  • lithium or other medicine to treat depression or mental illness;

  • blood pressure medicine;

  • a blood thinner such as warfarin, Coumadin, Jantoven;

  • cold or allergy medicine that contains a decongestant;

  • opioid (narcotic) medicine; or

  • seizure medicine.

This list is not complete and many other drugs can interact with amphetamine and dextroamphetamine. This includes prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Give a list of all your medicines to any healthcare provider who treats you.

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