Advair HFA

Name: Advair HFA

Warnings

Included as part of the PRECAUTIONS section.

Advair HFA Drug Class

Advair HFA is part of the drug class:

  • Inhaled adrenergic and other drugs for obstructive airway diseases

Advair HFA Food Interactions

 

Medications can interact with certain foods. In some cases, this may be harmful and your doctor may advise you to avoid certain foods. In the case of Advair HFA, there are no specific foods that you must exclude from your diet when receiving this medication.

You should not use Advair HFA if you have a severe allergy to milk proteins. See the "Drug Precautions" section.

 

Inform MD

 

Before taking Advair HFA, tell your doctor about all of your medical conditions.  Especially tell your doctor if you:

  • are allergic to Advair HFA or to any of its ingredients
  • have heart problems
  • have high blood pressure
  • have seizures
  • have thyroid problems
  • have diabetes
  • have liver problems
  • have osteoporosis (weak bones)
  • have an immune system problem
  • have eye problems such as glaucoma or cataracts
  • have any type of viral, bacterial, or fungal infection
  • are exposed to chickenpox or measles
  • have any other medical conditions
  • are pregnant or plan to become pregnant
  • are breastfeeding

Tell your doctor about all the medicines you take including prescription and non-prescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements.

 

Advair HFA Dosage

 

Take this medication exactly as prescribed by your doctor.  Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully.

The dose your doctor recommends may be based on the following:

  • the condition being treated
  • other medical conditions you have
  • other medications you are taking
  • how you respond to this medication
  • your weight
  • your height
  • your age

The recommended dose of Advair HFA for the treatment of asthma in people 12 years of age and older is 2 inhalation twice a day, in the morning and evening, about 12 hours apart.

 

 

What should I avoid while using Advair HFA (fluticasone and salmeterol)?

Do not use a second inhaled bronchodilator unless your doctor tells you to. This includes formoterol (Foradil, Perforomist, Symbicort, Dulera), arformoterol (Brovana), indacaterol (Arcapta), olodaterol (Striverdi, Stiolto Respimat), salmeterol (Serevent), or vilanterol (Bree Ellipta, Anoro Ellipta).

Avoid being near people who are sick or have infections. Call your doctor for preventive treatment if you are exposed to chicken pox or measles. These conditions can be serious or even fatal in people who are using steroid medicine.

Uses For Advair HFA

Fluticasone and salmeterol is a combination of two medicines that are used to help control the symptoms of asthma and improve breathing. It is used when a patient's asthma has not been controlled sufficiently on other asthma medicines, or when a patient's condition is so severe that more than one medicine is needed every day. This medicine will not relieve an asthma attack that has already started.

This medicine is also used to treat air flow blockage and reduce the worsening of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This includes chronic bronchitis and emphysema.

Inhaled fluticasone belongs to the family of medicines known as corticosteroids or steroids (cortisone-like medicines). It works by preventing certain cells in the lungs and breathing passages from releasing substances that cause asthma symptoms.

Inhaled salmeterol is a long-acting bronchodilator. Bronchodilators are medicines that are breathed in through the mouth to open up the bronchial tubes (air passages) in the lungs. It relieves cough, wheezing, shortness of breath, and troubled breathing by increasing the flow of air through the bronchial tubes.

This medicine must be used with a short-acting medicine (eg, albuterol) for an asthma attack or asthma symptoms that need attention right away.

This medicine is available only with your doctor's prescription.

Precautions While Using Advair HFA

If you will be using this medicine for a long time, it is very important that your doctor check the progress of you or your child at regular visits. This will allow your doctor to see if the medicine is working properly and to check for any unwanted effects.

Tell your doctor if you or your child are also using other medicines for your COPD. Your doctor may want you to stop using the medicine and use it only during a severe COPD attack. Follow your doctor's instructions on how you should take your medicine.

This medicine should not be used if you are having a severe COPD attack, or if symptoms of a COPD attack has already started. Your doctor may prescribe another medicine for you to use in case of an acute COPD attack. If the other medicine does not work as well, tell your doctor right away.

This medicine should only be used as an additional treatment for patients who cannot be treated with other asthma medicines (such as inhaled corticosteroids) or for asthma patients that require two medicines, including salmeterol. Ask your doctor if you have any questions.

Although this medicine decreases the number of asthma episodes, it may increase the chance of a severe asthma attack when they do occur. Be sure to read about these risks in the Medication Guide and talk to your doctor or pharmacist about any questions or concerns that you have.

You should not use this medicine if your asthma attack has already started. Your doctor will prescribe another medicine (eg, a short-acting inhaler) for you to use in case of an acute asthma attack. Make sure you understand how to use the short-acting inhaler. Talk to your doctor if you need instructions.

Talk with your doctor or get medical care right away if:

  • Your or your child's symptoms do not improve after using this medicine for 1 week or if they become worse.
  • Your short-acting inhaler does not seem to work as well as it used to and you or your child need it more often than normal (eg, you use 1 whole canister of the short-acting inhaler in 8 weeks time, or you need to use 4 or more inhalations of the short-acting inhaler for 2 or more days in a row).
  • You or your child have a big decrease in your peak flow when measured as directed by your doctor.

Do not use this medicine to treat wheezing that is getting worse. Call your doctor right away if wheezing worsens while using this medicine.

Do not use any other asthma medicine or medicine for breathing problems without talking to your doctor. This medicine should not be used with other inhalers that contain budesonide and formoterol combination (Symbicort®), formoterol (Foradil® Aerolizer®, Perforomist™), or arformoterol (Brovona™).

This medicine may cause a fungus infection of the mouth or throat (thrush). Tell your doctor right away if you have white patches in the mouth or throat; or pain when eating or swallowing.

Patients with COPD may be more likely to have pneumonia. Call your doctor if you or your child start having increased sputum (spit) production, change in sputum color, fever, chills, increased cough, or an increase in breathing problems.

Do not change your dose or stop using your medicine without first asking your doctor.

Your doctor may want you to carry a medical identification (ID) card stating that you or your child are using this medicine. The card will say that you may need additional medicine during an emergency, a severe asthma attack or other illness, or unusual stress.

Using too much of this medicine or using it for a long time may cause may increase your risk of having adrenal gland problems. Talk to your doctor if you or your child have more than one of these symptoms while you are using this medicine: darkening of the skin, diarrhea, dizziness, fainting, loss of appetite, mental depression, nausea, skin rash, unusual tiredness or weakness, or vomiting.

This medicine may cause paradoxical bronchospasm, which means your breathing or wheezing will get worse. Paradoxical bronchospasm may be life-threatening. Check with your doctor right away if you or your child are having a cough, difficulty with breathing, shortness of breath, or wheezing after using this medicine.

If you or your child develop a skin rash, hives, or any allergic reaction (including anaphylaxis) to this medicine, check with your doctor as soon as possible.

Check with your doctor right away if you or your child have chest pain, a fast heartbeat, nervousness, shaking of the hands or feet, noisy breathing, a feeling of choking, or tightness or irritation of the throat while using this medicine.

This medicine may affect blood sugar and potassium levels. If you have heart disease or are diabetic and notice a change in the results of your blood or urine sugar or potassium tests, check with your doctor.

Check with your doctor right away if blurred vision, difficulty in reading, or any other change in vision occurs during or after treatment. Your doctor may want you or your child to have your eyes checked by an ophthalmologist (eye doctor).

This medicine may decrease bone mineral density when used for a long time. A low bone mineral density can cause weak bones or osteoporosis. If you have any questions about this, ask your doctor.

This medicine may cause children to grow more slowly than usual. Talk to your child's doctor if you have any concerns.

Do not take other medicines unless they have been discussed with your doctor. This includes prescription or nonprescription (over-the-counter [OTC]) medicines and herbal or vitamin supplements.

Usual Adult Dose for Asthma - Maintenance

Inhalation Powder:
-1 inhalation of fluticasone 100 mcg-salmeterol 50 mcg, fluticasone 250 mcg-salmeterol 50 mcg, or fluticasone 500 mcg-salmeterol 50 mcg orally twice a day
-Maximum dose: Fluticasone 500 mcg-salmeterol 50 mcg orally twice a day

Inhalation Aerosol:
-2 inhalations of fluticasone 45 mcg-salmeterol 21 mcg, fluticasone 115 mcg-salmeterol 21 mcg, or fluticasone 230 mcg-salmeterol 21 mcg orally twice a day
-Maximum dose: Fluticasone 230 mcg-salmeterol 31 mcg orally twice a day

Comments:
-Inhalations should be administered approximately 12 hours apart.
-Initial dose should be based on the patient's asthma severity.
-If shortness of breath occurs in the period between doses, use an inhaled, short-acting beta2-agonist for immediate relief.
-Improvement in asthma control occurs within 30 minutes of beginning treatment; maximum benefit can take 1 week or longer.
-The inhalation dose can be increased if response does not improve after 2 weeks of therapy.
-If previously effective dose fails to improve asthma control, reevaluate treatment and consider additional therapies (e.g., adding additional inhaled or oral corticosteroid).

Uses: Treatment of asthma in patients not adequately controlled on a long term asthma control medication such as an inhaled corticosteroid, or whose disease severity clearly warrants initiation of treatment with both an inhaled corticosteroid and a LABA

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