Advil

Name: Advil

Ibuprofen Dosage

Ibuprofen purchased over-the-counter comes in tablets or capsules of 200 mg, while prescription doses are available in 400, 600, and 800 mg tablets.

For adults and children over 12 years of age, the usual dose of ibuprofen is one to two tablets or capsules every four to six hours as needed.

Do not take more than 2,400 mg (12 capsules or tablets) of ibuprofen daily. Take ibuprofen with food or after meals if it seems to bother your stomach.

Prescription doses of ibuprofen normally range between 400 mg to 800 mg, up every six to eight hours. In those cases, you should not take more than 3.2 g or 3,200 mg daily.

For bone and joint pain due to osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, doses range from 300 mg, 400 mg, 600 mg, or 800 mg, every six to eight hours with no more than 3.2 g or 3,200 mg to be taken daily.

Ibuprofen Overdose

If you suspect an overdose, contact a poison control center or emergency room immediately.

You can get in touch with a poison control center at (800) 222-1222.

Missed Dose of Ibuprofen

If you miss a dose of Ibuprofen, try to take it as soon as you remember.

However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and resume your regular dosing schedule.

Don't double up to make up for a missed dose.

Advil Drug Class

Advil is part of the drug class:

  • Propionic acid derivatives

Advil Precautions

Serious side effects have been reported with ibuprofen including:

  • Heart attack or stroke: Tell your healthcare provider right away if you have some or all of the following symptoms of...
    • shortness of breath
    • chest pain
    • weakness
    • slurring of speech
  • Hypertension: new hypertension or worsening of preexisting hypertension
    • Have your blood pressure monitored by your doctor closely if taking ibuprofen, especially if you have a history of hypertension or are taking medications to treat hypertension
  • Congestive heart failure (CHF): Tell your doctor if you...
    • have or have had CHF diagnosed in the past
    • note signs of CHF, such as swelling in the arms or legs, shortness of breath, unexplained weight gain, or fatigue
  • Serious and sometimes fatal skin reaction: Tell your healthcare provider right away if you have some or all of the following symptoms of...
    • rash
    • blistering
    • itching
    • fever
  • Stomach bleeding, and/or ulceration: Tell your healthcare provider right away if you have some or all of the following symptoms of...
    • pain
    • blood in stools (black or tarry stools)
    • coughing up of blood
    • indigestion or general stomach discomfort
  • Liver toxicity: Tell your healthcare provider right away if you have some or all of the following...
    • flu-like symptoms
    • fatigue
    • nausea
    • yellow tinting of the skin or eyes
  • Kidney injury: Patients at greatest risk of this reaction include those with preexisting renal dysfunction, heart failure,liver injury, those taking diuretics or ACE inhibitors, and the elderly. Ibuprofen is not recommended in these patients with advanced renal disease.
  • Anaphylactoid reaction: Tell your healthcare provider right away if you have some or all of the following symptoms...
    • swelling of the face or throat
    • difficulty of breathing
  • Changes in vision: Tell your healthcare provider right away if you have some or all of the following symptoms...
    • blurred or decreased vision
    • changes in color vision
    • dark or gray spots in field of vision
  • Pregnancy: In late pregnancy, ibuprofen should be avoided since it may cause premature closure of the ductus arteriosus.

Do not take ibuprofen if the following has occurred:

  • an allergic reaction to ibuprofen
  • asthma, hives, or other allergic-type reactions after taking aspirin or other NSAIDs
  • coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery; ibuprofen is not to be used for treating pain before or after this surgery

Ibuprofen can cause dizziness. Do not drive or operate heavy machinery until you know how Ibuprofen affects you.

Advil and Pregnancy

Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant.

The FDA categorizes medications based on safety for use during pregnancy. Five categories - A, B, C, D, and X, are used to classify the possible risks to an unborn baby when a medication is taken during pregnancy.

Ibuprofen falls into category C. This medication may be given to a pregnant woman if her healthcare provider believes that its benefits to the pregnant woman outweigh any possible risks to her unborn baby.

In addition, ibuprofen is known to cause heart defects on the developing fetus. Use during pregnancy, especially during late pregnancy, should be avoided.

Advil Dosage

Dosing may vary according to type of and severity of condition.

Advil Overdose

If you take too much ibuprofen, call your healthcare provider or local Poison Control Center, or seek emergency medical attention right away.

 

Commonly used brand name(s)

In the U.S.

  • Addaprin
  • Advil
  • A-G Profen
  • Bufen
  • Genpril
  • Haltran
  • Ibu
  • Ibu-2
  • Ibu-200
  • Ibu-4
  • Ibu-6
  • Ibu-8
  • Ibuprohm
  • Ibu-Tab
  • I-Prin
  • Midol
  • Motrin
  • Nuprin
  • Proprinal
  • Q-Profen

In Canada

  • Actiprofen
  • Advil Children's
  • Advil Pediatric
  • Children's Motrin
  • Children's Motrin Berry Flavor
  • Children's Motrin Bubble Gum Flavor
  • Children's Motrin Grape Flavor
  • Equate Children's Ibuprofen - Berry
  • Equate Children's Ibuprofen - Berry - Dye Free
  • Infants' Motrin
  • Option+ Children's Ibuprofen - Berry
  • Option+ Children's Ibuprofen - Grape

Available Dosage Forms:

  • Suspension
  • Tablet
  • Capsule, Liquid Filled
  • Tablet, Chewable
  • Capsule

Therapeutic Class: Analgesic

Pharmacologic Class: NSAID

Chemical Class: Propionic Acid (class)

Proper Use of ibuprofen

This section provides information on the proper use of a number of products that contain ibuprofen. It may not be specific to Advil. Please read with care.

For safe and effective use of this medicine, do not take more of it, do not take it more often, and do not take it for a longer time than ordered by your doctor. Taking too much of this medicine may increase the chance of unwanted effects, especially in elderly patients .

When used for severe or continuing arthritis, this medicine must be taken regularly as ordered by your doctor in order for it to help you. This medicine usually begins to work within one week, but in severe cases up to two weeks or even longer may pass before you begin to feel better. Also, several weeks may pass before you feel the full effects of this medicine .

To lessen stomach upset, you may take this medicine with food or milk .

Dosing

The dose of this medicine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.

The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine.

  • For oral dosage form (tablets and suspension):
    • For fever:
      • Children over 2 years of age—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.
      • Children 6 months of age up to 2 years—Dose is based on body weight and body temperature, and must be determined by your doctor. For fever lower than 102.5 °F (39.2 °C), the dose usually is 5 milligrams (mg) per kilogram (kg) (about 2.2 mg per pound) of body weight. For higher fever, the dose usually is 10 mg per kg (about 4.5 mg per pound) of body weight. The medicine may be given every six to eight hours, as needed, up to 40 mg per kg per day.
      • Infants younger than 6 months of age—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor .
    • For menstrual cramps:
      • Adults—400 milligrams (mg) every four hours, as needed.
      • Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor .
    • For mild to moderate pain:
      • Adults and teenagers—400 milligrams (mg) every four to six hours, as needed.
      • Children over 6 months of age—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The dose usually is 10 milligrams (mg) per kilogram (kg) of body weight every six to eight hours, as needed, up to 40 mg per kg per day.
      • Infants younger than 6 months of age—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor .
    • For osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis:
      • Adults and teenagers—1200 milligrams (mg) up to 3200 mg per day divided into three or four equal doses.
      • Children—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The dose usually is 30 milligrams (mg) to 40 mg per kilogram (kg) of body weight per day, divided into three or four doses.
      • Infants younger than 6 months of age—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor .

Missed Dose

If you miss a dose of this medicine, take it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not double doses.

Storage

Store the medicine in a closed container at room temperature, away from heat, moisture, and direct light. Keep from freezing.

Ask your healthcare professional how you should dispose of any medicine you do not use.

Keep out of the reach of children.

Do not keep outdated medicine or medicine no longer needed.

Uses

  • temporarily relieves minor aches and pains due to:
    • headache
    • toothache
    • backache
    • menstrual cramps
    • the common cold
    • muscular aches
    • minor pain of arthritis
  • temporarily reduces fever
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