Afeditab CR

Name: Afeditab CR

Afeditab CR Food Interactions

Grapefruit and grapefruit juice may interact with nifedipine and lead to potentially dangerous effects. Discuss the use of grapefruit products with your doctor.

Afeditab CR and Lactation

Tell your doctor if you are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed.

Low levels of nifedipine is known to cross into breastmilk. No negative effects have been reported thus far, so use of this medication may be continued in nursing mothers.

Afeditab CR Overdose

If you take too much nifedipine, call your healthcare provider or local Poison Control Center, or seek emergency medical attention right away.

How should I take Afeditab CR (nifedipine)?

Follow all directions on your prescription label. Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results. Do not take this medicine in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

You may need to take an extended-release tablet on an empty stomach. Follow the directions on your medicine label about taking this medication with or without food.

Do not crush, chew, or break an extended-release tablet. Swallow it whole.

Your blood pressure will need to be checked often and you may need other blood tests at your doctor's office.

Some tablet forms of nifedipine are made with a shell that is not absorbed or melted in the body. Part of the tablet shell may appear in your stool. This is a normal side effect of nifedipine and will not make the medication less effective.

If you need surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are using nifedipine. You may need to stop using the medicine at least 36 hours before surgery.

You may have very low blood pressure while taking this medication. Call your doctor if you are sick with vomiting or diarrhea, or if you are sweating more than usual.

If you are also taking a beta-blocker (atenolol, carvedilol, labetalol, metoprolol, nadolol, nebivolol, propranolol, sotalol, and others) you should not stop using the beta-blocker suddenly or you could have serious heart problems that will not be prevented by nifedipine. Follow your doctor's instructions about tapering your beta-blocker dose.

You should not stop using nifedipine suddenly. Stopping suddenly may make your condition worse.

If you are being treated for high blood pressure, keep using this medication even if you feel well. High blood pressure often has no symptoms. You may need to use blood pressure medication for the rest of your life.

Store at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What should I avoid while taking Afeditab CR (nifedipine)?

Grapefruit and grapefruit juice may interact with nifedipine and lead to unwanted side effects. Discuss the use of grapefruit products with your doctor.

Avoid getting up too fast from a sitting or lying position, or you may feel dizzy. Get up slowly and steady yourself to prevent a fall.

Indication and usage

Afeditab® CR is indicated for the treatment of hypertension. It may be used alone or in combination with other antihypertensive agents.

Warnings

Excessive Hypotension: Although in most patients the hypotensive effect of nifedipine is modest and well tolerated, occasional patients have had excessive and poorly tolerated hypotension. These responses have usually occurred during initial titration or at the time of subsequent upward dosage adjustment, and may be more likely in patients using concomitant beta-blockers.

Severe hypotension and/or increased fluid volume requirements have been reported in patients who received immediate-release capsules together with a beta-blocking agent and who underwent coronary artery bypass surgery using high dose fentanyl anesthesia. The interaction with high dose fentanyl appears to be due to the combination of nifedipine and a beta-blocker, but the possibility that it may occur with nifedipine alone, with low doses of fentanyl, in other surgical procedures, or with other narcotic analgesics cannot be ruled out. In nifedipine-treated patients where surgery using high dose fentanyl anesthesia is contemplated, the physician should be aware of these potential problems and, if the patient’s condition permits, sufficient time (at least 36 hours) should be allowed for nifedipine to be washed out of the body prior to surgery.

Increased Angina and/or Myocardial Infarction: Rarely, patients, particularly those who have severe obstructive coronary artery disease, have developed well-documented increased frequency, duration and/or severity of angina or acute myocardial infarction upon starting nifedipine or at the time of dosage increase. The mechanism of this effect is not established.

Beta-Blocker Withdrawal: When discontinuing a beta-blocker it is important to taper its dose, if possible, rather than stopping abruptly before beginning nifedipine. Patients recently withdrawn from beta-blockers may develop a withdrawal syndrome with increased angina, probably related to increased sensitivity to catecholamines. Initiation of nifedipine treatment will not prevent this occurrence and on occasion has been reported to increase it.

Congestive Heart Failure: Rarely, patients (usually while receiving a beta-blocker) have developed heart failure after beginning nifedipine. Patients with tight aortic stenosis may be at greater risk for such an event, as the unloading effect of nifedipine would be expected to be of less benefit to these patients, owing to their fixed impedance to flow across the aortic valve.

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