Azithromycin Injection

Name: Azithromycin Injection

Precautions

Before using azithromycin, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to it; or to any other macrolide/ketolide antibiotics (e.g., clarithromycin, erythromycin); or if you have any other allergies. This product may contain inactive ingredients, which can cause allergic reactions or other problems. Talk to your pharmacist for more details.Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist your medical history, especially of: kidney disease, liver disease, a certain muscle disease (myasthenia gravis).Azithromycin may cause a condition that affects the heart rhythm (QT prolongation). QT prolongation can infrequently result in serious (rarely fatal) fast/irregular heartbeat and other symptoms (such as severe dizziness, fainting) that need medical attention right away.The risk of QT prolongation may be increased if you have certain medical conditions or are taking other drugs that may cause QT prolongation. Before using azithromycin, tell your doctor or pharmacist of all the drugs you take and if you have any of the following conditions: certain heart problems (heart failure, slow heartbeat, QT prolongation in the EKG), family history of certain heart problems (QT prolongation in the EKG, sudden cardiac death).Low levels of potassium or magnesium in the blood may also increase your risk of QT prolongation. This risk may increase if you use certain drugs (such as diuretics/"water pills") or if you have conditions such as severe sweating, diarrhea, or vomiting. Talk to your doctor about using azithromycin safely.This medication contains sodium. Consult your doctor for more information if you are on a salt-restricted diet or if increased salt intake could worsen your condition (e.g., congestive heart failure).Older adults may be more sensitive to the side effects of this drug, especially swelling legs/feet (due to sodium and water retention) and QT prolongation (see above).During pregnancy, this medication should be used only when clearly needed. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor.This medication passes into breast milk. Consult your doctor before breast-feeding.

Notes

Laboratory and/or medical tests may be performed to monitor for side effects and response to treatment.

Missed dose

For the best possible benefit, it is important to receive each scheduled dose of this medication as directed. If the dose is missed, contact your doctor immediately to establish a new dosing schedule. Do not double the dose to catch up.

Storage

Consult the product instructions and your pharmacist for storage details. Keep all medicines out of reach of children and pets.Do not flush medications down the toilet or pour them into a drain unless instructed to do so. Properly discard this product when it is expired or no longer needed. Consult your pharmacist or local waste disposal company.

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Reviewed on 4/16/2014 References

What do I need to tell my doctor BEFORE I take Azithromycin Injection?

  • If you have an allergy to azithromycin or any other part of azithromycin injection.
  • If you are allergic to any drugs like this one, any other drugs, foods, or other substances. Tell your doctor about the allergy and what signs you had, like rash; hives; itching; shortness of breath; wheezing; cough; swelling of face, lips, tongue, or throat; or any other signs.
  • If you have any of these health problems: Long QT on ECG, low magnesium levels, or low potassium levels.
  • If you have a slow heartbeat, talk with your doctor.
  • If you have turned yellow or had liver side effects with this medicine before.
  • If you are taking any drugs that can cause a certain type of heartbeat that is not normal (prolonged QT interval). There are many drugs that can do this. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you are not sure.

This is not a list of all drugs or health problems that interact with azithromycin injection.

Tell your doctor and pharmacist about all of your drugs (prescription or OTC, natural products, vitamins) and health problems. You must check to make sure that it is safe for you to take this medicine with all of your drugs and health problems. Do not start, stop, or change the dose of any drug without checking with your doctor.

How is this medicine (Azithromycin Injection) best taken?

Use this medicine as ordered by your doctor. Read all information given to you. Follow all instructions closely.

  • It is given as an infusion into a vein over a period of time.

What do I do if I miss a dose?

  • Call your doctor to find out what to do.

Dosageand administration

[See Indications and Usage (1) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)] 

Community-Acquired Pneumonia

The recommended dose of azithromycin for injection for the treatment of adult patients with community-acquired pneumonia due to the indicated organisms is 500 mg as a single daily dose by the intravenous route for at least two days. Intravenous therapy should be followed by azithromycin by the oral route at a single, daily dose of 500 mg, administered as two 250 mg tablets to complete a 7- to 10-day course of therapy. The timing of the switch to oral therapy should be done at the discretion of the physician and in accordance with clinical response.

Pelvic Inflammatory Disease

The recommended dose of azithromycin for injection for the treatment of adult patients with pelvic inflammatory disease due to the indicated organisms is 500 mg as a single daily dose by the intravenous route for one or two days. Intravenous therapy should be followed by azithromycin by the oral route at a single, daily dose of 250 mg to complete a 7-day course of therapy. The timing of the switch to oral therapy should be done at the discretion of the physician and in accordance with clinical response.

Preparation of the Solution for Intravenous Administration

The infusate concentration and rate of infusion for azithromycin for injection should be either 1 mg/mL over 3 hr or 2 mg/mL over 1 hr. Azithromycin for injection should not be given as a bolus or as an intramuscular injection.


Reconstitution

Prepare the initial solution of azithromycin for injection by adding 4.8 mL of Sterile Water for Injection to the 500 mg vial, and shaking the vial until all of the drug is dissolved. Since azithromycin for injection is supplied under vacuum, it is recommended that a standard 5 mL (non-automated) syringe be used to ensure that the exact amount of 4.8 mL of Sterile Water is dispensed. Each mL of reconstituted solution contains 100 mg azithromycin. Reconstituted solution is stable for 24 hr when stored below 30°C (86°F).

Parenteral drug products should be inspected visually for particulate matter prior to administration. If particulate matter is evident in reconstituted fluids, the drug solution should be discarded.


Dilute this solution further prior to administration as instructed below.

Dilution

To provide azithromycin over a concentration range of 1 to 2 mg/mL, transfer 5 mL of the 100 mg/mL azithromycin solution into the appropriate amount of any of the diluents listed below:

Normal Saline (0.9% sodium chloride)

1/2 Normal Saline (0.45% sodium chloride)

5% Dextrose in Water

Lactated Ringer’s Solution

5% Dextrose in 1/2 Normal Saline (0.45% sodium chloride) with 20 mEq KCl

5% Dextrose in Lactated Ringer’s Solution

5% Dextrose in 1/3 Normal Saline (0.3% sodium chloride)

5% Dextrose in 1/2 Normal Saline (0.45% sodium chloride)

Normosol®-M in 5% Dextrose

Normosol®-R in 5% Dextrose

Final Infusion Solution Concentration (mg/mL)
Amount of Diluent (mL)
1 mg/mL
2 mg/mL
500 mL
250 mL

Other intravenous substances, additives, or medications should not be added to azithromycin for injection, or infused simultaneously through the same intravenous line.


Storage

When diluted according to the instructions (1 mg/mL to 2 mg/mL), azithromycin for injection is stable for 24 hr at or below room temperature 30°C (86°F), or for 7 days if stored under refrigeration 5°C (41°F).

Drug Interactions

Nelfinavir

Co-administration of nelfinavir at steady-state with a single oral dose of azithromycin resulted in increased azithromycin serum concentrations. Although a dose adjustment of azithromycin is not recommended when administered in combination with nelfinavir, close monitoring for known adverse reactions of azithromycin, such as liver enzyme abnormalities and hearing impairment, is warranted [see Adverse Reactions (6)].

Warfarin

Spontaneous post-marketing reports suggest that concomitant administration of azithromycin may potentiate the effects of oral anticoagulants such as warfarin, although the prothrombin time was not affected in the dedicated drug interaction study with azithromycin and warfarin. Prothrombin times should be carefully monitored while patients are receiving azithromycin and oral anticoagulants concomitantly.

Potential Drug-Drug Interaction with Macrolides

Interactions with the following drugs listed below have not been reported in clinical trials with azithromycin; however, no specific drug interaction studies have been performed to evaluate potential drug-drug interaction. However, drug interactions have been observed with other macrolide products. Until further data are developed regarding drug interactions when digoxin or phenytoin are used with azithromycin careful monitoring of patients is advised.

Use in specific populations

Pregnancy

Teratogenic Effects. Pregnancy Category B.

Reproductive and development studies have not been conducted using IV administration of azithromycin to animals. Reproduction studies have been performed in rats and mice using oral administration at doses up to moderately maternally toxic dose concentrations (i.e., 200 mg/kg/day). These daily doses in rats and mice based on body surface area, are estimated to be 4 and 2 times, respectively, an adult daily dose of 500 mg. In the animal studies, no evidence of harm to the fetus due to azithromycin was found. There are, however, no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women. Because animal reproduction studies are not always predictive of human response, azithromycin should be used during pregnancy only if clearly needed.

Nursing Mothers

Azithromycin has been reported to be excreted in human breast milk in small amounts. Caution should be exercised when azithromycin is administered to a nursing woman.

Pediatric Use

Safety and effectiveness of azithromycin for injection in children or adolescents under 16 years have not been established. In controlled clinical studies, azithromycin has been administered to pediatric patients (age 6 months to 16 years) by the oral route. For information regarding the use of azithromycin for oral suspension in the treatment of pediatric patients, [see Indications and Usage (1), and Dosage and Administration (2)] of the prescribing information for azithromycin for oral suspension 100 mg/5 mL and 200 mg/5 mL bottles.

Geriatric Use

Pharmacokinetic studies with intravenous azithromycin have not been performed in older volunteers. Pharmacokinetics of azithromycin following oral administration in older volunteers (65 to 85 years old) were similar to those in younger volunteers (18 to 40 years old) for the 5-day therapeutic regimen.


In multiple-dose clinical trials of intravenous azithromycin in the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia, 45% of patients (188/414) were at least 65 years of age and 22% of patients (91/414) were at least 75 years of age. No overall differences in safety were observed between these subjects and younger subjects in terms of adverse reactions, laboratory abnormalities, and discontinuations. Similar decreases in clinical response were noted in azithromycin- and comparator-treated patients with increasing age.


Azithromycin for injection contains 114 mg (4.96 mEq) of sodium per vial. At the usual recommended doses, patients would receive 114 mg (4.96 mEq) of sodium. The geriatric population may respond with a blunted natriuresis to salt loading. The total sodium content from dietary and non-dietary sources may be clinically important with regard to such diseases as congestive heart failure.


Elderly patients may be more susceptible to development of torsades de pointes arrhythmias than younger patients [see Warnings and Precautions (5.4)].

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