Lansoprazole, Clarithromycin, and Amoxicillin

Name: Lansoprazole, Clarithromycin, and Amoxicillin

How should this medicine be used?

Lansoprazole comes as a delayed-release (releases the medication in the intestine to prevent break-down of the medication by stomach acids) capsule, clarithromycin comes as a tablet, and amoxicillin comes as a capsule, all to be taken by mouth. These medications are usually taken before a meal twice a day. To help you take the right number of capsules and tablets at each dose, the medication is packaged in dosing cards. Each dosing card contains all of the medication needed for both daily doses. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain any part you do not understand. Take the medication exactly as directed. Do not take more or less of it or take it more often than prescribed by your doctor.

Swallow the tablets and capsules whole; do not split, chew, or crush them.

Take lansoprazole, clarithromycin, and amoxicillin until you finish the prescription, even if you feel better. If you stop taking antibiotics too soon your infection may not be completely treated and the bacteria may become resistant to antibiotics.

If your condition does not improve or gets worse, call your doctor.

Other uses for this medicine

These medications may be prescribed for other uses. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

What special dietary instructions should I follow?

Unless your doctor tells you otherwise, continue your normal diet.

What should I do if I forget a dose?

Take the missed dose (one lansoprazole capsule, one clarithromycin tablet, and two amoxicillin capsules) as soon as you remember it. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and continue your regular dosing schedule. Do not take a double dose to make up for a missed one.

What side effects can this medication cause?

Lansoprazole, clarithromycin, and amoxicillin may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away:

  1. diarrhea
  2. stomach pain or cramps
  3. vomiting
  4. nausea
  5. change in ability to taste food
  6. headache
  7. dizziness

Some side effects can be serious. If you experience any of the following symptoms, call your doctor immediately:

  1. blistering or peeling skin
  2. rash
  3. hives`
  4. swelling of the face, eyes, lips, tongue, arms, or legs
  5. difficulty breathing or swallowing
  6. hoarseness
  7. sore throat, fever, chills, and other signs of infection
  8. watery or bloody diarrhea with or without stomach pain that occurs during your treatment or for up to 2 months afterward

Lansoprazole, amoxicillin, and clarithromycin may cause other side effects. Call your doctor if you have any unusual problems while you are taking these medications.

People who take proton pump inhibitors such as lansoprazole may be more likely to fracture their wrists, hips, or spine than people who do not take one of these medications. The risk is highest in people who take high doses of one of these medications or take them for 1 year or longer. The risk may also be higher in people who are 50 years of age or older. Talk to your doctor about the risk of taking lansoprazole.

If you experience a serious side effect, you or your doctor may send a report to the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting program online (http://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch) or by phone (1-800-332-1088).

What should I know about storage and disposal of this medication?

Keep this medication in the daily packets and storage box it came in, tightly closed, and out of reach of children. Store it at room temperature and away from light and excess heat and moisture (not in the bathroom).

Unneeded medications should be disposed of in special ways to ensure that pets, children, and other people cannot consume them. However, you should not flush this medication down the toilet. Instead, the best way to dispose of your medication is through a medicine take-back program. Talk to your pharmacist or contact your local garbage/recycling department to learn about take-back programs in your community. See the FDA's Safe Disposal of Medicines website (http://goo.gl/c4Rm4p) for more information if you do not have access to a take-back program.

It is important to keep all medication out of sight and reach of children as many containers (such as weekly pill minders and those for eye drops, creams, patches, and inhalers) are not child-resistant and young children can open them easily. To protect young children from poisoning, always lock safety caps and immediately place the medication in a safe location – one that is up and away and out of their sight and reach. http://www.upandaway.org

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