NovoLog (Insulin Aspart (Cartridges & Prefilled Syringes))

Name: NovoLog (Insulin Aspart (Cartridges & Prefilled Syringes))

What do I need to tell my doctor BEFORE I take NovoLog?

  • If you have an allergy to insulin or any other part of NovoLog (insulin aspart (cartridges & prefilled syringes)).
  • If you are allergic to any drugs like this one, any other drugs, foods, or other substances. Tell your doctor about the allergy and what signs you had, like rash; hives; itching; shortness of breath; wheezing; cough; swelling of face, lips, tongue, or throat; or any other signs.
  • If you have low blood sugar.

This is not a list of all drugs or health problems that interact with this medicine.

Tell your doctor and pharmacist about all of your drugs (prescription or OTC, natural products, vitamins) and health problems. You must check to make sure that it is safe for you to take NovoLog with all of your drugs and health problems. Do not start, stop, or change the dose of any drug without checking with your doctor.

What are some things I need to know or do while I take NovoLog?

  • Tell all of your health care providers that you take this medicine. This includes your doctors, nurses, pharmacists, and dentists.
  • Allergic reactions have happened with NovoLog. Rarely, some reactions can be very bad or life-threatening. Talk with the doctor.
  • Low blood sugar may happen with this medicine. Very low blood sugar can lead to seizures, passing out, long lasting brain damage, and sometimes death. Talk with the doctor.
  • Low blood potassium may happen with NovoLog. If not treated, this can lead to a heartbeat that is not normal, very bad breathing problems, and sometimes death. Talk with the doctor.
  • Avoid driving and doing other tasks or actions that call for you to be alert until you see how this medicine affects you.
  • Some diabetes drugs like pioglitazone or rosiglitazone may cause heart failure or make it worse in people who already have it. Using insulin with these drugs may increase this risk. If you also take one of these drugs, talk with the doctor.
  • Be sure you have the right insulin product. Insulin products come in many containers like vials, cartridges, and pens. Be sure that you know how to measure and get your dose ready. If you have any questions, call your doctor or pharmacist.
  • It may be harder to control your blood sugar during times of stress like when you have a fever, an infection, an injury, or surgery. A change in level of physical activity or exercise and a change in diet may also affect your blood sugar. Talk with your doctor.
  • Wear disease medical alert ID (identification).
  • Do not drive if your blood sugar has been low. There is a greater chance of you having a crash.
  • Check your blood sugar as you have been told by your doctor.
  • Have blood work checked as you have been told by the doctor. Talk with the doctor.
  • Talk with your doctor before you drink alcohol.
  • Do not share pen or cartridge devices with another person even if the needle has been changed. Sharing these devices may pass infections from one person to another. This includes infections you may not know you have.
  • If you are 65 or older, use NovoLog with care. You could have more side effects.
  • Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan on getting pregnant. You will need to talk about the benefits and risks of using this medicine while you are pregnant.
  • Tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding. You will need to talk about any risks to your baby.

If OVERDOSE is suspected

If you think there has been an overdose, call your poison control center or get medical care right away. Be ready to tell or show what was taken, how much, and when it happened.

Consumer Information Use and Disclaimer

  • If your symptoms or health problems do not get better or if they become worse, call your doctor.
  • Do not share your drugs with others and do not take anyone else's drugs.
  • Keep a list of all your drugs (prescription, natural products, vitamins, OTC) with you. Give this list to your doctor.
  • Talk with the doctor before starting any new drug, including prescription or OTC, natural products, or vitamins.
  • Some drugs may have another patient information leaflet. Check with your pharmacist. If you have any questions about this medicine, please talk with your doctor, nurse, pharmacist, or other health care provider.
  • If you think there has been an overdose, call your poison control center or get medical care right away. Be ready to tell or show what was taken, how much, and when it happened.

This information should not be used to decide whether or not to take NovoLog or any other medicine. Only the healthcare provider has the knowledge and training to decide which medicines are right for a specific patient. This information does not endorse any medicine as safe, effective, or approved for treating any patient or health condition. This is only a brief summary of general information about this medicine. It does NOT include all information about the possible uses, directions, warnings, precautions, interactions, adverse effects, or risks that may apply to NovoLog (insulin aspart (cartridges & prefilled syringes)). This information is not specific medical advice and does not replace information you receive from the healthcare provider. You must talk with the healthcare provider for complete information about the risks and benefits of using this medicine.

Review Date: October 4, 2017

In Summary

Commonly reported side effects of insulin aspart include: hypoglycemia. See below for a comprehensive list of adverse effects.

For the Consumer

Applies to insulin aspart: subcutaneous solution

Along with its needed effects, insulin aspart may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur while taking insulin aspart:

More common
  • Anxious feeling
  • behavior change similar to being drunk
  • blurred vision
  • cold sweats
  • confusion
  • convulsions (seizures)
  • depression
  • difficulty with thinking
  • dizziness or lightheadedness
  • drowsiness
  • excessive hunger
  • fast heartbeat
  • headache
  • irritability or abnormal behavior
  • nightmares
  • restless sleep
  • shakiness
  • slurred speech
  • tingling in the hands, feet, lips, or tongue
Less common or rare
  • Depression of the skin at the place of injection
  • dryness of the mouth
  • fast or weak pulse
  • feeling of pressure, itching, redness, soreness, stinging, swelling, or tingling at the place of injection
  • increased thirst
  • irregular heartbeat
  • loss of appetite
  • mood or mental changes
  • muscle cramps or pain
  • nausea or vomiting
  • skin rash or itching over the whole body
  • sweating
  • thickening of the skin at the place of injection
  • trouble breathing
  • unusual tiredness or weakness

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