Nyquil Cold & Flu

Name: Nyquil Cold & Flu

Nyquil Cold & Flu Overview

Nyquil Cold & Flu is an over the counter medication used to treat headache, fever, sore throat, sneezing, runny nose and cough in adults and children 12 years and older.

Nyquil Cold & Flu contains 3 ingredients: doxylamine, acetaminophen, and dextromethorphan.

Doxylamine belongs to a group of drugs called antihistamines. These work by blocking the action of histamine, a substance in the body that causes allergic symptoms.

Acetaminophen belongs to a group of drugs called analgesics. These work by changing the way the body senses pain and cooling the body.

Dextromethorphan belongs to a group of drugs called cough suppressants. These work by decreasing activity in the part of the brain that causes coughing.

This medication comes in a solution form and is taken every 6 hours as needed.

Common side effects of Nyquil Cold & flu include dizziness, lightheadedness and drowsiness.

 

Nyquil Cold & Flu Drug Class

Nyquil Cold & Flu is part of the drug class:

  • Anilides

What is the most important information I should know about this medicine?

Do not use this medicine if you have taken an MAO inhibitor in the past 14 days. A dangerous drug interaction could occur. MAO inhibitors include isocarboxazid, linezolid, phenelzine, rasagiline, selegiline, and tranylcypromine.

Do not take more of this medication than is recommended. An overdose of acetaminophen can damage your liver or cause death. Call your doctor at once if you have nausea, pain in your upper stomach, itching, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, or jaundice (yellowing of your skin or eyes).

In rare cases, acetaminophen may cause a severe skin reaction. Stop taking this medicine and call your doctor right away if you have skin redness or a rash that spreads and causes blistering and peeling.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking this medicine?

Ask a doctor before taking medicine that contains acetaminophen if you have ever had liver disease, or if you drink more than 3 alcoholic beverages per day.

Do not use this medicine if you have taken an MAO inhibitor in the past 14 days. A dangerous drug interaction could occur. MAO inhibitors include furazolidone, isocarboxazid, linezolid, phenelzine, rasagiline, selegiline, and tranylcypromine.

You should not use this medication if you are allergic to acetaminophen (Tylenol), doxylamine, or dextromethorphan.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist before taking this medicine if you have any medical condition, especially:

  • asthma or COPD, cough with mucus, or cough caused by smoking, emphysema, or chronic bronchitis;

  • a blockage in your stomach or intestines;

  • liver disease, alcoholism, or if you drink more than 3 alcoholic beverages per day;

  • kidney disease;

  • an enlarged prostate, problems with urination;

  • glaucoma; or

  • if you take potassium (Cytra, Epiklor, K-Lyte, K-Phos, Kaon, Klor-Con, Polycitra, Urocit-K).

It is not known whether this medicine will harm an unborn baby. Do not use cough and cold medicine without a doctor's advice if you are pregnant.

This medicine may pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Antihistamines may also slow breast milk production. Do not use cough and cold medicine without a doctor's advice if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Artificially sweetened liquid medicine may contain phenylalanine. Check the medication label if you have phenylketonuria (PKU).

Always ask a doctor before giving a cough or cold medicine to a child. Death can occur from the misuse of cough and cold medicines in very young children.

What should I avoid while taking this medicine?

Ask a doctor or pharmacist before using any other cold, allergy, pain, or sleep medication. Acetaminophen (sometimes abbreviated as APAP) is contained in many combination medicines. Taking certain products together can cause you to get too much acetaminophen which can lead to a fatal overdose. Check the label to see if a medicine contains acetaminophen or APAP.

Avoid drinking alcohol. It may increase your risk of liver damage while you are taking acetaminophen, and can increase certain side effects.

This medication may cause blurred vision and may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert and able to see clearly.

What are some side effects that I need to call my doctor about right away?

WARNING/CAUTION: Even though it may be rare, some people may have very bad and sometimes deadly side effects when taking a drug. Tell your doctor or get medical help right away if you have any of the following signs or symptoms that may be related to a very bad side effect:

  • Signs of an allergic reaction, like rash; hives; itching; red, swollen, blistered, or peeling skin with or without fever; wheezing; tightness in the chest or throat; trouble breathing or talking; unusual hoarseness; or swelling of the mouth, face, lips, tongue, or throat.
  • Signs of liver problems like dark urine, feeling tired, not hungry, upset stomach or stomach pain, light-colored stools, throwing up, or yellow skin or eyes.
  • Not able to pass urine or change in how much urine is passed.
  • A very bad skin reaction (Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis) may happen. It can cause very bad health problems that may not go away, and sometimes death. Get medical help right away if you have signs like red, swollen, blistered, or peeling skin (with or without fever); red or irritated eyes; or sores in your mouth, throat, nose, or eyes.
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