Octagam IGIV

Name: Octagam IGIV

Important information

Octagam can cause blood clots. A blood clot may be more likely if you have risk factors such as heart disease, blood circulation problems, estrogen use, a history of blood clots, if you are 65 years or older, if you have been bed-ridden, or if you are using a catheter.

Stop using Octagam and call your doctor at once if you have:

  • signs of a blood clot in the brain--sudden numbness or weakness (especially on one side of the body), slurred speech, problems with vision or balance;

  • signs of a blood clot in the heart or lung--chest pain, rapid heart rate, sudden cough, wheezing, rapid breathing, coughing up blood; or

  • signs of a blood clot in your leg--pain, swelling, warmth, or redness in one or both legs.

Octagam can also harm your kidneys, especially if you already have kidney disease or if you also use certain other medicines. Many other drugs (including some over-the-counter medicines) can be harmful to the kidneys.

Call your doctor at once if you have signs of a kidney problem, such as swelling, rapid weight gain, and little or no urinating.

Drink plenty of liquids while you are using Octagam to help improve your blood flow and keep your kidneys working properly.

Before using Octagam?

You should not use Octagam if you have ever had an allergic reaction to an immune globulin or if you have immune globulin A (IgA) deficiency with antibody to IgA.

Octagam can harm your kidneys or cause blood clots. To make sure this medicine is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have:

  • heart disease, blood circulation problems or a blood vessel disorder;

  • a history of stroke or blood clot;

  • if you use estrogens (birth control pills or hormone replacement therapy);

  • kidney disease;

  • diabetes;

  • a serious infection called sepsis;

  • hyperproteinemia (too much protein in the blood);

  • paraproteinemia (abnormal proteins in the blood);

  • if you are dehydrated;

  • if you are 65 years or older;

  • if you have been bed-ridden due to severe illness; or

  • if you are using a catheter.

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether Octagam will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication.

It is not known whether immune globulin passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Octagam is made from human plasma (part of the blood) which may contain viruses and other infectious agents. Donated plasma is tested and treated to reduce the risk of it containing infectious agents, but there is still a small possibility it could transmit disease. Talk with your doctor about the risks and benefits of using this medication.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Call your doctor for instructions if you miss a dose of this medication.

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