Olanzapine Tablets

Name: Olanzapine Tablets

What do I need to tell my doctor BEFORE I take Olanzapine Tablets?

  • If you have an allergy to olanzapine or any other part of this medicine.
  • If you are allergic to any drugs like this one, any other drugs, foods, or other substances. Tell your doctor about the allergy and what signs you had, like rash; hives; itching; shortness of breath; wheezing; cough; swelling of face, lips, tongue, or throat; or any other signs.
  • If you are breast-feeding. Do not breast-feed while you take this medicine (olanzapine tablets).

This medicine may interact with other drugs or health problems.

Tell your doctor and pharmacist about all of your drugs (prescription or OTC, natural products, vitamins) and health problems. You must check to make sure that it is safe for you to take this medicine with all of your drugs and health problems. Do not start, stop, or change the dose of any drug without checking with your doctor.

How is this medicine (Olanzapine Tablets) best taken?

Use this medicine (olanzapine tablets) as ordered by your doctor. Read all information given to you. Follow all instructions closely.

  • Drink lots of noncaffeine liquids unless told to drink less liquid by your doctor.
  • Be careful in hot weather or while being active. Drink lots of fluids to stop fluid loss.
  • Check your blood sugar as you have been told by your doctor.
  • Take with or without food. Take with food if it causes an upset stomach.
  • To gain the most benefit, do not miss doses.
  • Keep taking this medicine as you have been told by your doctor or other health care provider, even if you feel well.

What do I do if I miss a dose?

  • Take a missed dose as soon as you think about it.
  • If it is close to the time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your normal time.
  • Do not take 2 doses at the same time or extra doses.

Indications & usage

Schizophrenia


Oral Olanzapine Tablets are indicated for the treatment of schizophrenia. Efficacy was established in three clinical trials in adult patients with schizophrenia: two 6-week trials and one maintenance trial. In adolescent patients with schizophrenia (ages 13 to 17), efficacy was established in one 6-week trial [see  Clinical Studies (14.1)].

When deciding among the alternative treatments available for adolescents, clinicians should consider the increased potential (in adolescents as compared with adults) for weight gain and dyslipidemia. Clinicians should consider the potential long-term risks when prescribing to adolescents, and in many cases this may lead them to consider prescribing other drugs first in adolescents [see  Warnings and Precautions (5.5)].

Bipolar I Disorder (Manic or Mixed Episodes)


Monotherapy - Oral Olanzapine Tablets are indicated for the acute treatment of manic or mixed episodes associated with bipolar I disorder and maintenance treatment of bipolar I disorder. Efficacy was established in three clinical trials in adult patients with manic or mixed episodes of bipolar I disorder: two 3- to 4-week trials and one monotherapy maintenance trial. In adolescent patients with manic or mixed episodes associated with bipolar I disorder (ages 13  to 17), efficacy was established in one 3-week trial [see Clinical Studies (14.2)].

When deciding among the alternative treatments available for adolescents, clinicians should consider the increased potential (in adolescents as compared with adults) for weight gain and dyslipidemia. Clinicians should consider the potential long-term risks when prescribing to adolescents, and in many cases this may lead them to consider prescribing other drugs first in adolescents [see Warnings and Precautions (5.5)].

Adjunctive Therapy to Lithium or Valproate - Oral Olanzapine Tablets are indicated for the treatment of manic or mixed episodes associated with bipolar I disorder as an adjunct to lithium or valproate. Efficacy was established in two 6-week clinical trials in adults. The effectiveness of adjunctive therapy for longer-term use has not been systematically evaluated in controlled trials [see Clinical Studies (14.2)].

Special Considerations in Treating Pediatric Schizophrenia and Bipolar I Disorder

Pediatric schizophrenia and bipolar I disorder are serious mental disorders; however, diagnosis can be challenging. For pediatric schizophrenia, symptom profiles can be variable, and for bipolar I disorder, pediatric patients may have variable patterns of periodicity of manic or mixed symptoms. It is recommended that medication therapy for pediatric schizophrenia and bipolar I disorder be initiated only after a thorough diagnostic evaluation has been performed and careful consideration given to the risks associated with medication treatment. Medication treatment for both pediatric schizophrenia and bipolar I disorder should be part of a total treatment program that often includes psychological, educational and social interventions.

Olanzapine Tablets and Fluoxetine in Combination: Depressive Episodes Associated with Bipolar I Disorder


Oral Olanzapine Tablets and fluoxetine in combination is indicated for the treatment of depressive episodes associated with bipolar I disorder, based on clinical studies. When using Olanzapine Tablets and fluoxetine in combination, refer to the Clinical Studies section of the package insert for Symbyax.

Olanzapine Tablets monotherapy is not indicated for the treatment of depressive episodes associated with bipolar I disorder.

Dosage & administration

Schizophrenia


Adults
Dose Selection - Oral olanzapine should be administered on a once-a-day schedule without regard to meals, generally beginning with 5 to 10 mg initially, with a target dose of 10 mg/day within several days. Further dosage adjustments, if indicated, should generally occur at intervals of not less than 1 week, since steady state for olanzapine would not be achieved for approximately 1 week in the typical patient. When dosage adjustments are necessary, dose increments/decrements of 5 mg QD are recommended.

Efficacy in schizophrenia was demonstrated in a dose range of 10 to 15 mg/day in clinical trials. However, doses above 10 mg/day were not demonstrated to be more efficacious than the 10 mg/day dose. An increase to a dose greater than the target dose of 10 mg/day (i.e., to a dose of 15 mg/day or greater) is recommended only after clinical assessment. Olanzapine is not indicated for use in doses above 20 mg/day.

Dosing in Special Populations - The recommended starting dose is 5 mg in patients who are debilitated, who have a predisposition to hypotensive reactions, who otherwise exhibit a combination of factors that may result in slower metabolism of olanzapine (e.g., nonsmoking female patients ≥65 years of age), or who may be more pharmacodynamically sensitive to olanzapine [see Warnings and Precautions (5.13), Drug Interactions (7), and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. When indicated, dose escalation should be performed with caution in these patients.

Maintenance Treatment - The effectiveness of oral olanzapine, 10 mg/day to 20 mg/day, in maintaining treatment response in schizophrenic patients who had been stable on Olanzapine Tablets for approximately 8 weeks and were then followed for relapse has been demonstrated in a placebo-controlled trial [see Clinical Studies (14.1)]. The physician who elects to use Olanzapine Tablets for extended periods should periodically reevaluate the long-term usefulness of the drug for the individual patient.


Adolescents
Dose Selection - Oral olanzapine should be administered on a once-a-day schedule without regard to meals with a recommended starting dose of 2.5 or 5 mg, with a target dose of 10 mg/day. Efficacy in adolescents with schizophrenia was demonstrated based on a flexible dose range of 2.5 to 20 mg/day in clinical trials, with a mean modal dose of 12.5 mg/day (mean dose of 11.1 mg/day). When dosage adjustments are necessary, dose increments/decrements of 2.5 or 5 mg are recommended.

The safety and effectiveness of doses above 20 mg/day have not been evaluated in clinical trials [see Clinical Studies (14.1)].

Maintenance Treatment - The efficacy of Olanzapine Tablets for the maintenance treatment of schizophrenia in the adolescent population has not been systematically evaluated; however, maintenance efficacy can be extrapolated from adult data along with comparisons of olanzapine pharmacokinetic parameters in adult and adolescent patients. Thus, it is generally recommended that responding patients be continued beyond the acute response, but at the lowest dose needed to maintain remission. Patients should be periodically reassessed to determine the need for maintenance treatment.

Bipolar I Disorder (Manic or Mixed Episodes)


Adults
Dose Selection for Monotherapy - Oral olanzapine should be administered on a once-a-day schedule without regard to meals, generally beginning with 10 or 15 mg. Dosage adjustments, if indicated, should generally occur at intervals of not less than 24 hours, reflecting the procedures in the placebo-controlled trials. When dosage adjustments are necessary, dose increments/decrements of 5 mg QD are recommended.

Short-term (3 to 4 weeks) antimanic efficacy was demonstrated in a dose range of 5 mg to 20 mg/day in clinical trials. The safety of doses above 20 mg/day has not been evaluated in clinical trials [see Clinical Studies (14.2)].

Maintenance Monotherapy - The benefit of maintaining bipolar I patients on monotherapy with oral Olanzapine Tablets at a dose of 5 to 20 mg/day, after achieving a responder status for an average duration of 2 weeks, was demonstrated in a controlled trial [see Clinical Studies (14.2)]. The physician who elects to use Olanzapine Tablets for extended periods should periodically reevaluate the long-term usefulness of the drug for the individual patient.

Dose Selection for Adjunctive Treatment - When administered as adjunctive treatment to lithium or valproate, oral olanzapine dosing should generally begin with 10 mg once-a-day without regard to meals.
Antimanic efficacy was demonstrated in a dose range of 5 mg to 20 mg/day in clinical trials [see Clinical Studies (14.2)]. The safety of doses above 20 mg/day has not been evaluated in clinical trials.


Adolescents
Dose Selection - Oral olanzapine should be administered on a once-a-day schedule without regard to meals with a recommended starting dose of 2.5 or 5 mg, with a target dose of 10 mg/day. Efficacy in adolescents with bipolar I disorder (manic or mixed episodes) was demonstrated based on a flexible dose range of 2.5 to 20 mg/day in clinical trials, with a mean modal dose of 10.7 mg/day (mean dose of 8.9 mg/day). When dosage adjustments are necessary, dose increments/decrements of 2.5 or 5 mg are recommended.

The safety and effectiveness of doses above 20 mg/day have not been evaluated in clinical trials [see Clinical Studies (14.2)].

Maintenance Treatment - The efficacy of Olanzapine Tablets for the maintenance treatment of bipolar I disorder in the adolescent population has not been evaluated; however, maintenance efficacy can be extrapolated from adult data along with comparisons of olanzapine pharmacokinetic parameters in adult and adolescent patients. Thus, it is generally recommended that responding patients be continued beyond the acute response, but at the lowest dose needed to maintain remission. Patients should be periodically reassessed to determine the need for maintenance treatment.


Olanzapine Tablets and Fluoxetine in Combination: Depressive Episodes Associated with Bipolar I Disorder


When using Olanzapine Tablets and fluoxetine in combination, also refer to the Clinical Studies section of the package insert for Symbyax.

Adults
Oral olanzapine should be administered in combination with fluoxetine once daily in the evening, without regard to meals, generally beginning with 5 mg of oral olanzapine and 20 mg of fluoxetine. Dosage adjustments, if indicated, can be made according to efficacy and tolerability within dose ranges of oral olanzapine 5 to 12.5 mg and fluoxetine 20 to 50 mg. Antidepressant efficacy was demonstrated with Olanzapine Tablets and fluoxetine in combination in adult patients with a dose range of olanzapine 6 to 12 mg and fluoxetine 25 to 50 mg. Safety of co-administration of doses above 18 mg olanzapine with 75 mg fluoxetine has not been evaluated in clinical studies.

Children and Adolescents (10 to 17 years of age)
Oral olanzapine should be administered in combination with fluoxetine once daily in the evening, without regard to meals, generally beginning with 2.5 mg of oral olanzapine and 20 mg of fluoxetine. Dosage adjustments, if indicated, can be made according to efficacy and tolerability. Safety of co-administration of doses above 12 mg olanzapine with 50 mg fluoxetine has not been evaluated in pediatric clinical studies.
Safety and efficacy of Olanzapine Tablets and fluoxetine in combination was determined in clinical trials supporting approval of Symbyax (fixed dose combination of Olanzapine Tablets and fluoxetine). Symbyax is dosed between 3 mg/25 mg (olanzapine/fluoxetine) per day and 12 mg/50 mg (olanzapine/fluoxetine) per day. The following table demonstrates the appropriate individual component doses of Olanzapine Tablets and fluoxetine versus Symbyax. Dosage adjustments, if indicated, should be made with the individual components according to efficacy and tolerability.

Table 1: Approximate Dose Correspondence Between Symbyaxa and the Combination of Olanzapine Tablets and Fluoxetine



 
For Symbyax (mg/day)

 
Use in Combination

Olanzapine Tablets (mg/day) 


Fluoxetine (mg/day) 
 3 mg olanzapine/25 mg fluoxetine  2.5  20
 6 mg olanzapine/25 mg fluoxetine  5  20
 12 mg olanzapine/25 mg fluoxetine  10+2.5  20
 6 mg olanzapine/50 mg fluoxetine  5  40+10
 12 mg olanzapine/50 mg fluoxetine  10+2.5  40+10

a Symbyax (olanzapine/fluoxetine hydrochloride) is a fixed-dose combination of Olanzapine Tablets and fluoxetine.
While there is no body of evidence to answer the question of how long a patient treated with Olanzapine Tablets and fluoxetine in combination should remain on it, it is generally accepted that bipolar I disorder, including the depressive episodes associated with bipolar I disorder, is a chronic illness requiring chronic treatment. The physician should periodically reexamine the need for continued pharmacotherapy.

Olanzapine Tablets monotherapy is not indicated for the treatment of depressive episodes associated with bipolar I disorder.



Olanzapine Tablets and Fluoxetine in Combination: Dosing in Special Populations

The starting dose of oral olanzapine 2.5 to 5 mg with fluoxetine 20 mg should be used for patients with a predisposition to hypotensive reactions, patients with hepatic impairment, or patients who exhibit a combination of factors that may slow the metabolism of olanzapine or fluoxetine in combination (female gender, geriatric age, nonsmoking status), or those patients who may be pharmacodynamically sensitive to olanzapine. Dosing modification may be necessary in patients who exhibit a combination of factors that may slow metabolism. When indicated, dose escalation should be performed with caution in these patients. Olanzapine Tablets and fluoxetine in combination have not been systematically studied in patients over 65 years of age or in patients under 10 years of age [see Warnings and Precautions (5.13), Drug Interactions (7), and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

Dosage forms & strengths


  • Olanzapine Tablets USP, 2.5 mg are yellow colored, circular, biconvex uncoated tablets, debossed with ‘C’ on one side and ‘45’ on the other side.
  • Olanzapine Tablets USP, 5 mg are yellow colored, circular, biconvex uncoated tablets, debossed with ‘C’ on one side and ‘46’ on the other side.
  • Olanzapine Tablets USP, 7.5 mg are yellow colored, circular, biconvex uncoated tablets, debossed with ‘C’ on one side and ‘47’ on the other side.
  • Olanzapine Tablets USP, 10 mg are yellow colored, circular, biconvex uncoated tablets, debossed with ‘C’ on one side and ‘48’ on the other side.
  • Olanzapine Tablets USP, 15 mg are yellow colored, circular, biconvex uncoated tablets, debossed with ‘C’ on one side and ‘49’ on the other side.
  • Olanzapine Tablets USP, 20 mg are yellow colored, circular, biconvex uncoated tablets, debossed with ‘C’ on one side and ‘50’ on the other side.

Contraindications


  • None with Olanzapine Tablets monotherapy.
  • When using Olanzapine Tablets and fluoxetine in combination, also refer to the Contraindications section of the package insert for Symbyax.
  • For specific information about the contraindications of lithium or valproate, refer to the Contraindications section of the package inserts for these other products.

Drug Interactions

The risks of using olanzapine in combination with other drugs have not been extensively evaluated in systematic studies.

Potential for Other Drugs to Affect Olanzapine


Diazepam - The co-administration of diazepam with olanzapine potentiated the orthostatic hypotension observed with olanzapine [see Drug Interactions (7.2)].

Cimetidine and Antacids - Single doses of cimetidine (800 mg) or aluminum- and magnesium-containing antacids did not affect the oral bioavailability of olanzapine.

Inducers of CYP1A2 - Carbamazepine therapy (200 mg bid) causes an approximately 50% increase in the clearance of olanzapine. This increase is likely due to the fact that carbamazepine is a potent inducer of CYP1A2 activity. Higher daily doses of carbamazepine may cause an even greater increase in olanzapine clearance.

Alcohol - Ethanol (45 mg/70 kg single dose) did not have an effect on olanzapine pharmacokinetics. The co-administration of alcohol (i.e., ethanol) with olanzapine potentiated the orthostatic hypotension observed with olanzapine [see Drug Interactions (7.2)].

Inhibitors of CYP1A2
Fluvoxamine: Fluvoxamine, a CYP1A2 inhibitor, decreases the clearance of olanzapine. This results in a mean increase in olanzapine Cmax following fluvoxamine of 54% in female nonsmokers and 77% in male smokers. The mean increase in olanzapine AUC is 52% and 108%, respectively. Lower doses of olanzapine should be considered in patients receiving concomitant treatment with fluvoxamine.

Inhibitors of CYP2D6
Fluoxetine: Fluoxetine (60 mg single dose or 60 mg daily dose for 8 days) causes a small (mean 16%) increase in the maximum concentration of olanzapine and a small (mean 16%) decrease in olanzapine clearance. The magnitude of the impact of this factor is small in comparison to the overall variability between individuals, and therefore dose modification is not routinely recommended. When using olanzapine and fluoxetine in combination, also refer to the Drug Interactions section of the package insert for Symbyax.

Warfarin - Warfarin (20 mg single dose) did not affect olanzapine pharmacokinetics [see Drug Interactions (7.2)].

Inducers of CYP1A2 or Glucuronyl Transferase - Omeprazole and rifampin may cause an increase in olanzapine clearance.

Charcoal - The administration of activated charcoal (1 g) reduced the Cmax and AUC of oral olanzapine by about 60%. As peak olanzapine levels are not typically obtained until about 6 hours after dosing, charcoal may be a useful treatment for olanzapine overdose.


Potential for Olanzapine to Affect Other Drugs


CNS Acting Drugs - Given the primary CNS effects of olanzapine, caution should be used when olanzapine is taken in combination with other centrally acting drugs and alcohol.

Antihypertensive Agents - Olanzapine, because of its potential for inducing hypotension, may enhance the effects of certain antihypertensive agents.

Levodopa and Dopamine Agonists - Olanzapine may antagonize the effects of levodopa and dopamine agonists.

Lithium - Multiple doses of olanzapine (10 mg for 8 days) did not influence the kinetics of lithium. Therefore, concomitant olanzapine administration does not require dosage adjustment of lithium [see Warnings and Precautions (5.15)].

Valproate - Olanzapine (10 mg daily for 2 weeks) did not affect the steady state plasma concentrations of valproate. Therefore, concomitant olanzapine administration does not require dosage adjustment of valproate [see Warnings and Precautions (5.15)].

Effect of Olanzapine on Drug Metabolizing Enzymes - In vitro studies utilizing human liver microsomes suggest that olanzapine has little potential to inhibit CYP1A2, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, and CYP3A. Thus, olanzapine is unlikely to cause clinically important drug interactions mediated by these enzymes.

Imipramine - Single doses of olanzapine did not affect the pharmacokinetics of imipramine or its active metabolite desipramine.

Warfarin - Single doses of olanzapine did not affect the pharmacokinetics of warfarin [see Drug Interactions (7.1)].

Diazepam - Olanzapine did not influence the pharmacokinetics of diazepam or its active metabolite N-desmethyldiazepam. However, diazepam co-administered with olanzapine increased the orthostatic hypotension observed with either drug given alone [see Drug Interactions (7.1)].

Alcohol - Multiple doses of olanzapine did not influence the kinetics of ethanol [see Drug Interactions (7.1)].

Biperiden - Multiple doses of olanzapine did not influence the kinetics of biperiden.

Theophylline - Multiple doses of olanzapine did not affect the pharmacokinetics of theophylline or its metabolites.

Olanzapine Tablets Description

Olanzapine is an atypical antipsychotic that belongs to the thienobenzodiazepine class. The chemical designation is 2-methyl-4-(4-methyl-1-piperazinyl)-10H-thieno[2,3-b] [1,5]benzodiazepine. The molecular formula is C17H20N4S, which corresponds to a molecular weight of 312.44. The chemical structure is:







Olanzapine USP is a yellow crystalline solid, which is practically insoluble in water.

Olanzapine Tablets, USP are intended for oral administration only.

Each tablet contains olanzapine equivalent to 2.5 mg (8 μmol), 5 mg (16 μmol), 7.5 mg (24 μmol), 10 mg (32 μmol), 15 mg (48 μmol), or 20 mg (64 μmol). Inactive ingredients are crospovidone, hydroxypropyl cellulose, lactose monohydrate, and magnesium stearate.
Meets USP dissolution test 2.

Nonclinical Toxicology

Carcinogenesis & Mutagenesis & Impairment Of Fertility


Carcinogenesis Oral carcinogenicity studies were conducted in mice and rats. Olanzapine was administered to mice in two 78-week studies at doses of 3, 10, 30/20 mg/kg/day (equivalent to 0.8 to 5 times the maximum recommended human daily oral dose on a mg/m2 basis) and 0.25, 2, 8 mg/kg/day (equivalent to 0.06 to 2 times the maximum recommended human daily oral dose on a mg/m2 basis). Rats were dosed for 2 years at doses of 0.25, 1, 2.5, 4 mg/kg/day (males) and 0.25, 1, 4, 8 mg/kg/day (females) (equivalent to 0.13 to 2 and 0.13 to 4 times the maximum recommended human daily oral dose on a mg/m2 basis, respectively). The incidence of liver hemangiomas and hemangiosarcomas was significantly increased in 1 mouse study in female mice dosed at 8 mg/kg/day (2 times the maximum recommended human daily oral dose on a mg/m2 basis). These tumors were not increased in another mouse study in females dosed at 10 or 30/20 mg/kg/day (2 to 5 times the maximum recommended human daily oral dose on a mg/m2 basis); in this study, there was a high incidence of early mortalities in males of the 30/20 mg/kg/day group. The incidence of mammary gland adenomas and adenocarcinomas was significantly increased in female mice dosed at ≥2 mg/kg/day and in female rats dosed at ≥4 mg/kg/day (0.5 and 2 times the maximum recommended human daily oral dose on a mg/m2 basis, respectively). Antipsychotic drugs have been shown to chronically elevate prolactin levels in rodents. Serum prolactin levels were not measured during the olanzapine carcinogenicity studies; however, measurements during subchronic toxicity studies showed that olanzapine elevated serum prolactin levels up to 4-fold in rats at the same doses used in the carcinogenicity study. An increase in mammary gland neoplasms has been found in rodents after chronic administration of other antipsychotic drugs and is considered to be prolactin mediated. The relevance for human risk of the finding of prolactin mediated endocrine tumors in rodents is unknown [see Warnings and Precautions (5.14)].

Mutagenesis No evidence of genotoxic potential for olanzapine was found in the Ames reverse mutation test, in vivo micronucleus test in mice, the chromosomal aberration test in Chinese hamster ovary cells, unscheduled DNA synthesis test in rat hepatocytes, induction of forward mutation test in mouse lymphoma cells, or in vivo sister chromatid exchange test in bone marrow of Chinese hamsters.

Impairment of Fertility In an oral fertility and reproductive performance study in rats, male mating performance, but not fertility, was impaired at a dose of 22.4 mg/kg/day and female fertility was decreased at a dose of 3 mg/kg/day (11 and 1.5 times the maximum recommended human daily oral dose on a mg/m2 basis, respectively). Discontinuance of olanzapine treatment reversed the effects on male mating performance. In female rats, the precoital period was increased and the mating index reduced at 5 mg/kg/day (2.5 times the maximum recommended human daily oral dose on a mg/m2 basis). Diestrous was prolonged and estrous delayed at 1.1 mg/kg/day (0.6 times the maximum recommended human daily oral dose on a mg/m2 basis); therefore olanzapine may produce a delay in ovulation.

Animal Pharmacology & OR Toxicology

In animal studies with olanzapine, the principal hematologic findings were reversible peripheral cytopenias in individual dogs dosed at 10 mg/kg (17 times the maximum recommended human daily oral dose on a mg/m2 basis), dose-related decreases in lymphocytes and neutrophils in mice, and lymphopenia in rats. A few dogs treated with 10 mg/kg developed reversible neutropenia and/or reversible hemolytic anemia between 1 and 10 months of treatment. Dose-related decreases in lymphocytes and neutrophils were seen in mice given doses of 10 mg/kg (equal to 2 times the maximum recommended human daily oral dose on a mg/m2 basis) in studies of 3 months’ duration. Nonspecific lymphopenia, consistent with decreased body weight gain, occurred in rats receiving 22.5 mg/kg (11 times the maximum recommended human daily oral dose on a mg/m2 basis) for 3 months or 16 mg/kg (8 times the maximum recommended human daily oral dose on a mg/m2 basis) for 6 or 12 months. No evidence of bone marrow cytotoxicity was found in any of the species examined. Bone marrows were normocellular or hypercellular, indicating that the reductions in circulating blood cells were probably due to peripheral (non-marrow) factors.

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