Oxymetazoline Topical

Name: Oxymetazoline Topical

Dosing & Uses

Dosage Forms & Strengths

topical cream

  • 1% (available in a tube or pump bottle)
  • Each gram of cream contains 10 mg (1%) oxymetazoline hydrochloride, which is equivalent to 8.8 mg (0.88%) of oxymetazoline free base

Rosacea

Indicated for the topical treatment of persistent facial erythema associated with rosacea in adults

Apply topically qDay; use a pea-sized amount of cream in a thin layer to cover the entire face (forehead, nose, each cheek, and chin), avoiding the eyes and lips

Wash hands immediately after application

<18 years: Safety and efficacy not established

Dosage Forms & Strengths

topical cream 1% (available in a tube or pump bottle)

Rosacea

Indicated for the topical treatment of persistent facial erythema associated with rosacea in adults

Apply topically qDay; use a pea-sized amount of cream in a thin layer to cover the entire face (forehead, nose, each cheek, and chin) avoiding the eyes and lips

Wash hands immediately after application

Oxymetazoline Topical Dosage

Follow all directions on your prescription label. Do not use this medicine in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

Do not take by mouth. Topical medicine is for use only on the skin. Do not use this medicine on open wounds or irritated skin. If this medicine gets in your eyes, nose, mouth, or vagina, rinse with water.

Apply a thin layer of medication to cover the entire face. Do not apply near your eyes or mouth.

Wash your hands after applying this medicine.

Read all patient information, medication guides, and instruction sheets provided to you. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions.

Call your doctor if your symptoms do not improve, or if they get worse.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

An overdose of oxymetazoline is not expected to be dangerous. Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222 if anyone has accidentally swallowed the medication.

Use the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not use extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

Pronunciation

(oks i met AZ oh leen)

Use Labeled Indications

Rosacea: Treatment of persistent facial erythema associated with rosacea in adults

Dosing Hepatic Impairment

There are no dosage adjustments provided in the manufacturer’s labeling.

Patient Education

• Discuss specific use of drug and side effects with patient as it relates to treatment. (HCAHPS: During this hospital stay, were you given any medicine that you had not taken before? Before giving you any new medicine, how often did hospital staff tell you what the medicine was for? How often did hospital staff describe possible side effects in a way you could understand?)

• Have patient report immediately to prescriber severe application site irritation (HCAHPS).

• Educate patient about signs of a significant reaction (eg, wheezing; chest tightness; fever; itching; bad cough; blue skin color; seizures; or swelling of face, lips, tongue, or throat). Note: This is not a comprehensive list of all side effects. Patient should consult prescriber for additional questions.

Intended Use and Disclaimer: Should not be printed and given to patients. This information is intended to serve as a concise initial reference for health care professionals to use when discussing medications with a patient. You must ultimately rely on your own discretion, experience, and judgment in diagnosing, treating, and advising patients.

What is the most important information I should know about oxymetazoline topical?

Do not take by mouth. Topical medicine is for use only on the skin.

Rinse with water if this medicine gets in your eyes.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before using oxymetazoline topical?

You should not use this medicine if you are allergic to oxymetazoline.

To make sure oxymetazoline topical is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have:

  • heart disease, high blood pressure;

  • blood circulation problems;

  • glaucoma; or

  • peripheral vascular disease such as Raynaud's syndrome, Buerger's disease, scleroderma, or Sjögren's syndrome.

It is not known whether this medicine will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant.

It is not known whether oxymetazoline topical passes into breast milk or if it could affect the nursing baby. Tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding.

Oxymetazoline topical is not approved for use by anyone younger than 18 years old.

Side Effects

Skin reactions (dermatitis), redness, pain, or worsening of rosacea pimples may occur. If any of these effects last or get worse, tell your doctor or pharmacist promptly.

Remember that your doctor has prescribed this medication because he or she has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.

A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, get medical help right away if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, including: rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing.

This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist.

In the US -

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or at www.fda.gov/medwatch.

In Canada - Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to Health Canada at 1-866-234-2345.

List Oxymetazoline Cream side effects by likelihood and severity.

Precautions

Before using oxymetazoline, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to it; or if you have any other allergies. This product may contain inactive ingredients, which can cause allergic reactions or other problems. Talk to your pharmacist for more details.

Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist your medical history, especially of: glaucoma.

Before having surgery, tell your doctor or dentist about all the products you use (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs, and herbal products).

During pregnancy, this medication should be used only when clearly needed. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor.

It is unknown if this medication passes into breast milk. Consult your doctor before breast-feeding.

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