Thyroid gland

Name: Thyroid gland

Other uses for this medicine

This medication is sometimes prescribed for other uses; ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

What special precautions should I follow?

Before taking thyroid,

  • tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to thyroid, any other medications, pork, or any of the ingredients in thyroid tablets. Ask your pharmacist for a list of the ingredients.
  • tell your doctor and pharmacist what other prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, and nutritional supplements you are taking or plan to take. Be sure to mention any of the following: androgens such as danazol or testosterone; anticoagulants ('blood thinners') such as warfarin (Coumadin);antidepressants; aprepitant (Emend); carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Epitol, Tegretol);diabetes medications that you take by mouth;, digoxin (Lanoxin); efavirenz (Sustiva); estrogen (hormone replacement therapy) griseofulvin (Fulvicin, Grifulvin, Gris-PEG); human growth hormone (Genotropin); insulin; lovastatin (Altocor, Mevacor); nevirapine (Viramune); oral contraceptives containing estrogen; oral steroids such as dexamethasone (Decadron, Dexone, Dexpak), methylprednisolone (Medrol), and prednisone (Deltasone); phenobarbital (Luminal, Solfoton); phenytoin (Dilantin, Phenytek); potassium iodide (contained in Elixophyllin-Kl, Pediacof, KIE); rifabutin (Mycobutin); rifampin (Rifadin, Rimactane, in Rifamate); ritonavir (Norvir, in Kaletra);salicylate pain relievers such as aspirin and aspirin-containing products, choline magnesium trisalicylate, choline salicylate (Arthropan), diflunisal (Dolobid), magnesium salicylate (Doan's, others), and salsalate (Argesic, Disalcid, Salgesic); strong iodine solution (Lugol's Solution);and theophylline (Elixophyllin, Theolair, Theo-24, Quibron, others).
  • if you take cholestyramine (Questran) or colestipol (Colestid), take it at least 4 hours before taking your thyroid medication. If you take antacids, iron-containing medications or nutritional supplements, simethicone, or sucralfate (Carafate), take them at least 4 hours before or 4 hours after taking your thyroid medication.
  • tell your doctor what herbal products you are taking, especially St. John's wort.
  • tell your doctor if you have or have ever had diabetes; osteoporosis; hardening or narrowing of the arteries (atherosclerosis); cardiovascular disease such as high blood pressure, high blood cholesterol and fats, angina (chest pain), arrhythmias, or heart attack; malabsorption diseases (conditions that cause a decrease in absorption from the intestine); an underactive adrenal or pituitary gland; or kidney or liver disease.
  • tell your doctor if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding. If you become pregnant while taking thyroid, call your doctor.
  • talk to your doctor about the risks and benefits of taking thyroid if you are 65 years of age or older. Older adults should not usually take thyroid becasue it is not as safe as other medications that can be used to treat the same condition.
  • if you are having surgery, including dental surgery, tell the doctor or dentist that you are taking thyroid.

What special dietary instructions should I follow?

Unless your doctor tells you otherwise, continue your normal diet.

What side effects can this medication cause?

Thyroid may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away:

  • weight loss
  • shaking of a part of your body that you cannot control
  • headache
  • nausea
  • vomiting
  • diarrhea
  • stomach cramps
  • hyperactivity
  • anxiety
  • irritability or rapid changes in mood
  • difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep
  • flushing
  • increased appetite
  • fever
  • changes in menstrual cycle
  • muscle weakness
  • temporary hair loss, particularly in children during the first month of therapy

Some side effects can be serious. If you experience any of the following symptoms, call your doctor immediately:

  • rash
  • difficulty breathing or swallowing
  • chest pain
  • rapid or irregular heartbeat
  • swelling of the hands, feet, ankles, or lower legs
  • excessive sweating
  • sensitivity or intolerance to heat
  • nervousness
  • seizure

Thyroid may cause other side effects. Call your doctor if you have any unusual problems while taking this medication.

If you experience a serious side effect, you or your doctor may send a report to the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting program online (http://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch) or by phone (1-800-332-1088).

What should I know about storage and disposal of this medication?

Keep this medication in the container it came in, tightly closed, and out of reach of children. Store it at room temperature and away from excess heat and moisture (not in the bathroom).

Unneeded medications should be disposed of in special ways to ensure that pets, children, and other people cannot consume them. However, you should not flush this medication down the toilet. Instead, the best way to dispose of your medication is through a medicine take-back program. Talk to your pharmacist or contact your local garbage/recycling department to learn about take-back programs in your community. See the FDA's Safe Disposal of Medicines website (http://goo.gl/c4Rm4p) for more information if you do not have access to a take-back program.

It is important to keep all medication out of sight and reach of children as many containers (such as weekly pill minders and those for eye drops, creams, patches, and inhalers) are not child-resistant and young children can open them easily. To protect young children from poisoning, always lock safety caps and immediately place the medication in a safe location – one that is up and away and out of their sight and reach. http://www.upandaway.org

Other names

  • Desiccated thyroid
  • thyroid extract
  • thyroid gland
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